Trace evidence: here today, gone tomorrow?

James Robertson, Claude Roux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The recent report of the National Research Council of the US National Academies “Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: a Path Forward” found evidence that the level of scientific development and evaluation varies substantially among the forensic science disciplines. In this paper the status of trace evidence will be reviewed from an international perspective with particular reference to case studies. The paper will argue that the trace evidence discipline needs to learn from past experience and that serious coordinated action is required at an international level if trace evidence is to continue to meet the standards expected of forensic science in the future. The paper concludes that it is vital that trace evidence remains a key component of forensic investigation due to its important role in addressing the ‘what happened’ question.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)18-22
Number of pages5
JournalA U M L A
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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evidence
science
academy
evaluation
Forensic Science
experience
Strengthening
Evaluation
National Research Council

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Robertson, James ; Roux, Claude. / Trace evidence: here today, gone tomorrow?. In: A U M L A. 2010 ; Vol. 50, No. 1. pp. 18-22.
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Trace evidence: here today, gone tomorrow? / Robertson, James; Roux, Claude.

In: A U M L A, Vol. 50, No. 1, 2010, p. 18-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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