Training leading to repetition failure enhances bench press strength gains in elite junior athletes

Eric J. Drinkwater, Trent W. Lawton, Rod P. Lindsell, David B Pyne, Patrick H. Hunt, Michael J. Mckenna

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of training leading to repetition failure in the performance of 2 different tests: 6 repetition maximum (6RM) bench press strength and 40-kg bench throw power in elite junior athletes. Subjects were 26 elite junior male basketball players (n = 12; age = 18.6 +/- 0.3 years; height = 202.0 +/- 11.6 cm; mass = 97.0 +/- 12.9 kg; mean +/- SD) and soccer players (n = 14; age = 17.4 +/- 0.5 years; height = 179.0 +/- 7.0 cm; mass = 75.0 +/- 7.1 kg) with a history of greater than 6 months' strength training. Subjects were initially tested twice for 6RM bench press mass and 40-kg Smith machine bench throw power output (in watts) to establish retest reliability. Subjects then undertook bench press training with 3 sessions per week for 6 weeks, using equal volume programs (24 repetitions x 80-105% 6RM in 13 minutes 20 seconds). Subjects were assigned to one of two experimental groups designed either to elicit repetition failure with 4 sets of 6 repetitions every 260 seconds (RF(4 x 6)) or allow all repetitions to be completed with 8 sets of 3 repetitions every 113 seconds (NF(8 x 3)). The RF(4 x 6) treatment elicited substantial increases in strength (7.3 +/- 2.4 kg, +9.5%, p < 0.001) and power (40.8 +/- 24.1 W, +10.6%, p < 0.001), while the NF(8 x 3) group elicited 3.6 +/- 3.0 kg (+5.0%, p < 0.005) and 25 +/- 19.0 W increases (+6.8%, p < 0.001). The improvements in the RF(4 x 6) group were greater than those in the repetition rest group for both strength (p < 0.005) and power (p < 0.05). Bench press training that leads to repetition failure induces greater strength gains than nonfailure training in the bench press exercise for elite junior team sport athletes.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)382-388
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
    Volume19
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2005

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    Drinkwater, Eric J. ; Lawton, Trent W. ; Lindsell, Rod P. ; Pyne, David B ; Hunt, Patrick H. ; Mckenna, Michael J. / Training leading to repetition failure enhances bench press strength gains in elite junior athletes. In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2005 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 382-388.
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    abstract = "The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of training leading to repetition failure in the performance of 2 different tests: 6 repetition maximum (6RM) bench press strength and 40-kg bench throw power in elite junior athletes. Subjects were 26 elite junior male basketball players (n = 12; age = 18.6 +/- 0.3 years; height = 202.0 +/- 11.6 cm; mass = 97.0 +/- 12.9 kg; mean +/- SD) and soccer players (n = 14; age = 17.4 +/- 0.5 years; height = 179.0 +/- 7.0 cm; mass = 75.0 +/- 7.1 kg) with a history of greater than 6 months' strength training. Subjects were initially tested twice for 6RM bench press mass and 40-kg Smith machine bench throw power output (in watts) to establish retest reliability. Subjects then undertook bench press training with 3 sessions per week for 6 weeks, using equal volume programs (24 repetitions x 80-105{\%} 6RM in 13 minutes 20 seconds). Subjects were assigned to one of two experimental groups designed either to elicit repetition failure with 4 sets of 6 repetitions every 260 seconds (RF(4 x 6)) or allow all repetitions to be completed with 8 sets of 3 repetitions every 113 seconds (NF(8 x 3)). The RF(4 x 6) treatment elicited substantial increases in strength (7.3 +/- 2.4 kg, +9.5{\%}, p < 0.001) and power (40.8 +/- 24.1 W, +10.6{\%}, p < 0.001), while the NF(8 x 3) group elicited 3.6 +/- 3.0 kg (+5.0{\%}, p < 0.005) and 25 +/- 19.0 W increases (+6.8{\%}, p < 0.001). The improvements in the RF(4 x 6) group were greater than those in the repetition rest group for both strength (p < 0.005) and power (p < 0.05). Bench press training that leads to repetition failure induces greater strength gains than nonfailure training in the bench press exercise for elite junior team sport athletes.",
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    Training leading to repetition failure enhances bench press strength gains in elite junior athletes. / Drinkwater, Eric J.; Lawton, Trent W.; Lindsell, Rod P.; Pyne, David B; Hunt, Patrick H.; Mckenna, Michael J.

    In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 19, No. 2, 05.2005, p. 382-388.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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