Transport and fate of metal contamination in estuaries: Using a model network to predict the contributions of physical and chemical factors

Bill MAHER, John Floyd, Jaimie Potts, Graeme Batley, Bernd GRUBER

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Estuaries are among the most important coastal features, both ecologically and with respect to human settlement and use (Ryan, 2003; Schneider et al., 2015a). Along with tropical rainforests and coral reefs, estuaries rank as the world's most productive ecosystems, more productive than both the rivers and the oceans that influence them (Harvey et al., 1998). Nevertheless, coal-fired power stations are often established on the shores of estuarine lakes in Australia where they may represent a threat to these environments (Batley, 1987; Schneider et al., 2015b)
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)227-236
    Number of pages10
    JournalChemosphere
    Volume153
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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