Trash Marine Hybrid Sculpture exhibited in “Unruly Orchestrations” exhibition, Belconnen Arts Center, Canberra (Australia)

Carlos Alberto Montana-Hoyos (Designer)

Research output: Non-textual formExhibition

Abstract

In today’s sea of post-industrial waste, different modes of adaptive repurposing orchestrate new and unruly trash-formed organisms. This urchin-cum-anemone marine creature is an ensemble of parts which reinterpret hybridisation, while exploring contradiction through relationships of in and out, smooth and spiky and colour contrasts. The fluidity of the inner surface contrasts with the textile and tactile qualities of the outer contour. Research statement This work is part of the a la lata series of experimental objects meticulously crafted from repurposed elements, within the theoretical framework of sustainability. The main reflection behind the fabrication process is the ease of producing trash, in contrast with the difficulty and time consumption of giving a new life to this sea
of trash in our contemporary world. This sculpture is one of the creative outcomes of a research project that studies the relationships between contemporary crafts and industrial design in third world countries, aiming to
develop new art and crafts. The research project studies strategies for design for sustainability, mainly adaptive repurposing. Experiments proposed adaptive repurposing of diverse materials, including aluminium can tabs.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jun 2014

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art
sustainability
industrial waste
aluminum
experiment
research project
craft
material
sea
consumption
organism
world
textile

Cite this

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abstract = "In today’s sea of post-industrial waste, different modes of adaptive repurposing orchestrate new and unruly trash-formed organisms. This urchin-cum-anemone marine creature is an ensemble of parts which reinterpret hybridisation, while exploring contradiction through relationships of in and out, smooth and spiky and colour contrasts. The fluidity of the inner surface contrasts with the textile and tactile qualities of the outer contour. Research statement This work is part of the a la lata series of experimental objects meticulously crafted from repurposed elements, within the theoretical framework of sustainability. The main reflection behind the fabrication process is the ease of producing trash, in contrast with the difficulty and time consumption of giving a new life to this seaof trash in our contemporary world. This sculpture is one of the creative outcomes of a research project that studies the relationships between contemporary crafts and industrial design in third world countries, aiming todevelop new art and crafts. The research project studies strategies for design for sustainability, mainly adaptive repurposing. Experiments proposed adaptive repurposing of diverse materials, including aluminium can tabs.",
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Trash Marine Hybrid Sculpture exhibited in “Unruly Orchestrations” exhibition, Belconnen Arts Center, Canberra (Australia). Montana-Hoyos, Carlos Alberto (Designer). 2014.

Research output: Non-textual formExhibition

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