Trends in nurse-administered procedural sedation and analgesia across cardiac catheterisation laboratories in Australia and New Zealand

Results of an electronic survey

Aaron Conway, John Rolley, Karen Page, Paul Fulbrook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Knowledge of current trends in nurse-administered procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory (CCL) may provide important insights into how to improve safety and effectiveness of this practice. Objective: To characterise current practice as well as education and competency standards regarding nurse-administered PSA in Australian and New Zealand CCLs. Design: A quantitative, cross-sectional, descriptive survey design was used. Methods: Data were collected using a web-based questionnaire on practice, educational standards and protocols related to nurse-administered PSA. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse data. Results: A sample of 62 nurses, each from a different CCL, completed a questionnaire that focused on PSA practice. Over half of the estimated total number of CCLs in Australia and New Zealand was represented. Nurse-administered PSA was used in 94% (n=58) of respondents CCLs. All respondents indicated that benzodiazepines, opioids or a combination of both is used for PSA (n=58). One respondent indicated that propofol was also used. 20% (n=12) indicated that deep sedation is purposefully induced for defibrillation threshold testing and cardioversion without a second medical practitioner present. Sedation monitoring practices vary considerably between institutions. 31% (n=18) indicated that comprehensive education about PSA is provided. 45% (n=26) indicated that nurses who administer PSA should undergo competency assessment. Conclusion: By characterising nurse-administered PSA in Australian and New Zealand CCLs, a baseline for future studies has been established. Areas of particular importance to improve include protocols for patient monitoring and comprehensive PSA education for CCL nurses in Australia and New Zealand.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4-10
Number of pages7
JournalAustralian Critical Care
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cardiac Catheterization
New Zealand
Analgesia
Nurses
Education
Deep Sedation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Electric Countershock
Physiologic Monitoring
Propofol
Benzodiazepines
Opioid Analgesics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Safety

Cite this

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title = "Trends in nurse-administered procedural sedation and analgesia across cardiac catheterisation laboratories in Australia and New Zealand: Results of an electronic survey",
abstract = "Background: Knowledge of current trends in nurse-administered procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory (CCL) may provide important insights into how to improve safety and effectiveness of this practice. Objective: To characterise current practice as well as education and competency standards regarding nurse-administered PSA in Australian and New Zealand CCLs. Design: A quantitative, cross-sectional, descriptive survey design was used. Methods: Data were collected using a web-based questionnaire on practice, educational standards and protocols related to nurse-administered PSA. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse data. Results: A sample of 62 nurses, each from a different CCL, completed a questionnaire that focused on PSA practice. Over half of the estimated total number of CCLs in Australia and New Zealand was represented. Nurse-administered PSA was used in 94{\%} (n=58) of respondents CCLs. All respondents indicated that benzodiazepines, opioids or a combination of both is used for PSA (n=58). One respondent indicated that propofol was also used. 20{\%} (n=12) indicated that deep sedation is purposefully induced for defibrillation threshold testing and cardioversion without a second medical practitioner present. Sedation monitoring practices vary considerably between institutions. 31{\%} (n=18) indicated that comprehensive education about PSA is provided. 45{\%} (n=26) indicated that nurses who administer PSA should undergo competency assessment. Conclusion: By characterising nurse-administered PSA in Australian and New Zealand CCLs, a baseline for future studies has been established. Areas of particular importance to improve include protocols for patient monitoring and comprehensive PSA education for CCL nurses in Australia and New Zealand.",
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Trends in nurse-administered procedural sedation and analgesia across cardiac catheterisation laboratories in Australia and New Zealand : Results of an electronic survey. / Conway, Aaron; Rolley, John; Page, Karen; Fulbrook, Paul.

In: Australian Critical Care, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.02.2014, p. 4-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trends in nurse-administered procedural sedation and analgesia across cardiac catheterisation laboratories in Australia and New Zealand

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AU - Page, Karen

AU - Fulbrook, Paul

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N2 - Background: Knowledge of current trends in nurse-administered procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory (CCL) may provide important insights into how to improve safety and effectiveness of this practice. Objective: To characterise current practice as well as education and competency standards regarding nurse-administered PSA in Australian and New Zealand CCLs. Design: A quantitative, cross-sectional, descriptive survey design was used. Methods: Data were collected using a web-based questionnaire on practice, educational standards and protocols related to nurse-administered PSA. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse data. Results: A sample of 62 nurses, each from a different CCL, completed a questionnaire that focused on PSA practice. Over half of the estimated total number of CCLs in Australia and New Zealand was represented. Nurse-administered PSA was used in 94% (n=58) of respondents CCLs. All respondents indicated that benzodiazepines, opioids or a combination of both is used for PSA (n=58). One respondent indicated that propofol was also used. 20% (n=12) indicated that deep sedation is purposefully induced for defibrillation threshold testing and cardioversion without a second medical practitioner present. Sedation monitoring practices vary considerably between institutions. 31% (n=18) indicated that comprehensive education about PSA is provided. 45% (n=26) indicated that nurses who administer PSA should undergo competency assessment. Conclusion: By characterising nurse-administered PSA in Australian and New Zealand CCLs, a baseline for future studies has been established. Areas of particular importance to improve include protocols for patient monitoring and comprehensive PSA education for CCL nurses in Australia and New Zealand.

AB - Background: Knowledge of current trends in nurse-administered procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory (CCL) may provide important insights into how to improve safety and effectiveness of this practice. Objective: To characterise current practice as well as education and competency standards regarding nurse-administered PSA in Australian and New Zealand CCLs. Design: A quantitative, cross-sectional, descriptive survey design was used. Methods: Data were collected using a web-based questionnaire on practice, educational standards and protocols related to nurse-administered PSA. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse data. Results: A sample of 62 nurses, each from a different CCL, completed a questionnaire that focused on PSA practice. Over half of the estimated total number of CCLs in Australia and New Zealand was represented. Nurse-administered PSA was used in 94% (n=58) of respondents CCLs. All respondents indicated that benzodiazepines, opioids or a combination of both is used for PSA (n=58). One respondent indicated that propofol was also used. 20% (n=12) indicated that deep sedation is purposefully induced for defibrillation threshold testing and cardioversion without a second medical practitioner present. Sedation monitoring practices vary considerably between institutions. 31% (n=18) indicated that comprehensive education about PSA is provided. 45% (n=26) indicated that nurses who administer PSA should undergo competency assessment. Conclusion: By characterising nurse-administered PSA in Australian and New Zealand CCLs, a baseline for future studies has been established. Areas of particular importance to improve include protocols for patient monitoring and comprehensive PSA education for CCL nurses in Australia and New Zealand.

KW - Artificial cardiac pacing

KW - Cardiac electrophysiology

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JO - Australian Critical Care

JF - Australian Critical Care

SN - 1036-7314

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