Twitterising journalism and J-Ed: an Australian political reporting case study

Julie Posetti

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

    Abstract

    Twitter is transforming pockets of journalism practice 140 characters at a time (Posetti 2009f) and challenging core elements of traditional journalistic ethics and professionalism in the process. In Australia, professional journalists have invaded the Twittersphere en masse, using the very popular micro-blogging platform as a diving board into the Real Time Web and a new model for interactive journalism which could be called ‘New Journalism 2.0’. Twitter’s transformative effect results in the merger of opinion, observational journalism and real time reportage, while fostering interaction between competitors, greater transparency of the Fourth Estate’s processes and practices, and unprecedented audience engagement. This transformation is well demonstrated by a case study of the biggest crisis to afflict Australian conservative politics in decades – a leadership ‘coup’ which became synonymous with the crowd-sourced Twitter hashtag #Spill. That case study, featuring a qualitative survey of eight high profile tweeting Australian political journalists, conducted in the immediate aftermath of the story’s conclusion, is the subject of this paper.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationWJEC 'New Media' Research Papers
    Place of PublicationGrahamstown, South Afrcia
    PublisherRhodes University School of Journalism and Media Studies
    Publication statusPublished - 2010
    EventThe Second World Journalism Education Congress (WJEC 2010) - Grahamstown, Grahamstown, South Africa
    Duration: 5 Jul 20107 Jul 2010

    Conference

    ConferenceThe Second World Journalism Education Congress (WJEC 2010)
    Abbreviated titleWJEC
    CountrySouth Africa
    CityGrahamstown
    Period5/07/107/07/10

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    diving
    ethics
    transparency
    leadership
    merger
    politics
    opinion
    effect

    Cite this

    Posetti, J. (2010). Twitterising journalism and J-Ed: an Australian political reporting case study. In WJEC 'New Media' Research Papers Grahamstown, South Afrcia: Rhodes University School of Journalism and Media Studies.
    Posetti, Julie. / Twitterising journalism and J-Ed: an Australian political reporting case study. WJEC 'New Media' Research Papers. Grahamstown, South Afrcia : Rhodes University School of Journalism and Media Studies, 2010.
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    title = "Twitterising journalism and J-Ed: an Australian political reporting case study",
    abstract = "Twitter is transforming pockets of journalism practice 140 characters at a time (Posetti 2009f) and challenging core elements of traditional journalistic ethics and professionalism in the process. In Australia, professional journalists have invaded the Twittersphere en masse, using the very popular micro-blogging platform as a diving board into the Real Time Web and a new model for interactive journalism which could be called ‘New Journalism 2.0’. Twitter’s transformative effect results in the merger of opinion, observational journalism and real time reportage, while fostering interaction between competitors, greater transparency of the Fourth Estate’s processes and practices, and unprecedented audience engagement. This transformation is well demonstrated by a case study of the biggest crisis to afflict Australian conservative politics in decades – a leadership ‘coup’ which became synonymous with the crowd-sourced Twitter hashtag #Spill. That case study, featuring a qualitative survey of eight high profile tweeting Australian political journalists, conducted in the immediate aftermath of the story’s conclusion, is the subject of this paper.",
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    Posetti, J 2010, Twitterising journalism and J-Ed: an Australian political reporting case study. in WJEC 'New Media' Research Papers. Rhodes University School of Journalism and Media Studies, Grahamstown, South Afrcia, The Second World Journalism Education Congress (WJEC 2010), Grahamstown, South Africa, 5/07/10.

    Twitterising journalism and J-Ed: an Australian political reporting case study. / Posetti, Julie.

    WJEC 'New Media' Research Papers. Grahamstown, South Afrcia : Rhodes University School of Journalism and Media Studies, 2010.

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

    TY - GEN

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    AB - Twitter is transforming pockets of journalism practice 140 characters at a time (Posetti 2009f) and challenging core elements of traditional journalistic ethics and professionalism in the process. In Australia, professional journalists have invaded the Twittersphere en masse, using the very popular micro-blogging platform as a diving board into the Real Time Web and a new model for interactive journalism which could be called ‘New Journalism 2.0’. Twitter’s transformative effect results in the merger of opinion, observational journalism and real time reportage, while fostering interaction between competitors, greater transparency of the Fourth Estate’s processes and practices, and unprecedented audience engagement. This transformation is well demonstrated by a case study of the biggest crisis to afflict Australian conservative politics in decades – a leadership ‘coup’ which became synonymous with the crowd-sourced Twitter hashtag #Spill. That case study, featuring a qualitative survey of eight high profile tweeting Australian political journalists, conducted in the immediate aftermath of the story’s conclusion, is the subject of this paper.

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    Posetti J. Twitterising journalism and J-Ed: an Australian political reporting case study. In WJEC 'New Media' Research Papers. Grahamstown, South Afrcia: Rhodes University School of Journalism and Media Studies. 2010