Ultrasound-based motor control training for the pelvic floor pre- and post-prostatectomy

Scoring reliability and skill acquisition

Stuart Doorbar-Baptist, Roger Adams, Trudy Rebbeck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: This study documents a protocol designed to evaluate pelvic floor motor control in men with prostate cancer. It also aims to evaluate the reliability of therapists in rating motor control of pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) using real time ultrasound imaging (RUSI) video clips. We further determine predictors of acquiring motor control. Methods: Ninety-one men diagnosed with prostate cancer attending a physiotherapy clinic for pelvic floor exercises were taught detailed pelvic floor motor control exercises by a physiotherapist using trans-abdominal RUSI for biofeedback. A new protocol to rate motor control skill acquisition was developed. Three independent physiotherapists assessed motor control skill attainment by viewing RUSI videos of the contractions. Inter-rater reliability was evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify predictors of successful skill attainment. Acquisition of the skill was compared between pre- and post-operative participants using an independent-group t-test. Results: There was good reliability for rating the RUSI video clips (ICC 0.73 (95%CI 0.59–0.82)) for experienced therapists. Having low BMI and being seen pre-operatively predicted motor skill attainment, accounting for 46.3% of the variance. Significantly more patients trained pre-operatively acquired the skill of pelvic floor control compared with patients initially seen post-operatively (OR 11.87, 95%CI 1.4 to 99.5, p = 0.02). Conclusions: A new protocol to evaluate attainment of pelvic floor control in men with prostate cancer can be assessed reliably from RUSI images, and is most effectively delivered pre-operatively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)296-302
Number of pages7
JournalPhysiotherapy Theory and Practice
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Pelvic Floor
Prostatectomy
Ultrasonography
Motor Skills
Prostatic Neoplasms
Physical Therapists
Surgical Instruments
Exercise
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Muscles

Cite this

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title = "Ultrasound-based motor control training for the pelvic floor pre- and post-prostatectomy: Scoring reliability and skill acquisition",
abstract = "Aim: This study documents a protocol designed to evaluate pelvic floor motor control in men with prostate cancer. It also aims to evaluate the reliability of therapists in rating motor control of pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) using real time ultrasound imaging (RUSI) video clips. We further determine predictors of acquiring motor control. Methods: Ninety-one men diagnosed with prostate cancer attending a physiotherapy clinic for pelvic floor exercises were taught detailed pelvic floor motor control exercises by a physiotherapist using trans-abdominal RUSI for biofeedback. A new protocol to rate motor control skill acquisition was developed. Three independent physiotherapists assessed motor control skill attainment by viewing RUSI videos of the contractions. Inter-rater reliability was evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify predictors of successful skill attainment. Acquisition of the skill was compared between pre- and post-operative participants using an independent-group t-test. Results: There was good reliability for rating the RUSI video clips (ICC 0.73 (95{\%}CI 0.59–0.82)) for experienced therapists. Having low BMI and being seen pre-operatively predicted motor skill attainment, accounting for 46.3{\%} of the variance. Significantly more patients trained pre-operatively acquired the skill of pelvic floor control compared with patients initially seen post-operatively (OR 11.87, 95{\%}CI 1.4 to 99.5, p = 0.02). Conclusions: A new protocol to evaluate attainment of pelvic floor control in men with prostate cancer can be assessed reliably from RUSI images, and is most effectively delivered pre-operatively.",
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author = "Stuart Doorbar-Baptist and Roger Adams and Trudy Rebbeck",
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pages = "296--302",
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Ultrasound-based motor control training for the pelvic floor pre- and post-prostatectomy : Scoring reliability and skill acquisition. / Doorbar-Baptist, Stuart; Adams, Roger; Rebbeck, Trudy.

In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, Vol. 33, No. 4, 2017, p. 296-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ultrasound-based motor control training for the pelvic floor pre- and post-prostatectomy

T2 - Scoring reliability and skill acquisition

AU - Doorbar-Baptist, Stuart

AU - Adams, Roger

AU - Rebbeck, Trudy

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Aim: This study documents a protocol designed to evaluate pelvic floor motor control in men with prostate cancer. It also aims to evaluate the reliability of therapists in rating motor control of pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) using real time ultrasound imaging (RUSI) video clips. We further determine predictors of acquiring motor control. Methods: Ninety-one men diagnosed with prostate cancer attending a physiotherapy clinic for pelvic floor exercises were taught detailed pelvic floor motor control exercises by a physiotherapist using trans-abdominal RUSI for biofeedback. A new protocol to rate motor control skill acquisition was developed. Three independent physiotherapists assessed motor control skill attainment by viewing RUSI videos of the contractions. Inter-rater reliability was evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify predictors of successful skill attainment. Acquisition of the skill was compared between pre- and post-operative participants using an independent-group t-test. Results: There was good reliability for rating the RUSI video clips (ICC 0.73 (95%CI 0.59–0.82)) for experienced therapists. Having low BMI and being seen pre-operatively predicted motor skill attainment, accounting for 46.3% of the variance. Significantly more patients trained pre-operatively acquired the skill of pelvic floor control compared with patients initially seen post-operatively (OR 11.87, 95%CI 1.4 to 99.5, p = 0.02). Conclusions: A new protocol to evaluate attainment of pelvic floor control in men with prostate cancer can be assessed reliably from RUSI images, and is most effectively delivered pre-operatively.

AB - Aim: This study documents a protocol designed to evaluate pelvic floor motor control in men with prostate cancer. It also aims to evaluate the reliability of therapists in rating motor control of pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) using real time ultrasound imaging (RUSI) video clips. We further determine predictors of acquiring motor control. Methods: Ninety-one men diagnosed with prostate cancer attending a physiotherapy clinic for pelvic floor exercises were taught detailed pelvic floor motor control exercises by a physiotherapist using trans-abdominal RUSI for biofeedback. A new protocol to rate motor control skill acquisition was developed. Three independent physiotherapists assessed motor control skill attainment by viewing RUSI videos of the contractions. Inter-rater reliability was evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify predictors of successful skill attainment. Acquisition of the skill was compared between pre- and post-operative participants using an independent-group t-test. Results: There was good reliability for rating the RUSI video clips (ICC 0.73 (95%CI 0.59–0.82)) for experienced therapists. Having low BMI and being seen pre-operatively predicted motor skill attainment, accounting for 46.3% of the variance. Significantly more patients trained pre-operatively acquired the skill of pelvic floor control compared with patients initially seen post-operatively (OR 11.87, 95%CI 1.4 to 99.5, p = 0.02). Conclusions: A new protocol to evaluate attainment of pelvic floor control in men with prostate cancer can be assessed reliably from RUSI images, and is most effectively delivered pre-operatively.

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KW - Middle Aged

KW - Motor Activity

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KW - Odds Ratio

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KW - Pelvic Floor Disorders/etiology

KW - Predictive Value of Tests

KW - Prostatectomy/adverse effects

KW - Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology

KW - Reproducibility of Results

KW - Risk Factors

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KW - Treatment Outcome

KW - Ultrasonography

KW - Urinary Incontinence, Stress/etiology

KW - Video Recording

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