Use of a tibial accelerometer to measure ground reaction force in running: A reliability and validity comparison with force plates

Damian P. Raper, Jeremy Witchalls, Elissa J. Philips, Emma Knight, Michael K Drew, Gordon Waddington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The use of microsensor technologies to conduct research and implement interventions in sports and exercise medicine has increased recently. The objective of this paper was to determine the validity and reliability of the ViPerform as a measure of load compared to vertical ground reaction force (GRF) as measured by force plates. Design: Absolute reliability assessment, with concurrent validity. Methods: 10 professional triathletes ran 10 trials over force plates with the ViPerform mounted on the mid portion of the medial tibia. Calculated vertical ground reaction force data from the ViPerform was matched to the same stride on the force plate. Bland-Altman (BA) plot of comparative measure of agreement was used to assess the relationship between the calculated load from the accelerometer and the force plates. Reliability was calculated by intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) with 95% confidence intervals. Results: BA plot indicates minimal agreement between the measures derived from the force plate and ViPerform, with variation at an individual participant plot level. Reliability was excellent (ICC = 0.877; 95% CI = 0.825-0.917) in calculating the same vertical GRF in a repeated trial. Standard error of measure (SEM) equalled 99.83 units (95% CI = 82.10-119.09), which, in turn, gave a minimum detectable change (MDC) value of 276.72 units (95% CI = 227.32-330.07). Conclusions: The ViPerform does not calculate absolute values of vertical GRF similar to those measured by a force plate. It does provide a valid and reliable calculation of an athlete's lower limb load at constant velocity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)84-88
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Volume21
Issue number1
Early online date2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Sports Medicine
Tibia
Reproducibility of Results
Running
Athletes
Lower Extremity
Confidence Intervals
Exercise
Technology
Research

Cite this

@article{7feeba3db11c4fdd8333e6618d59bc9a,
title = "Use of a tibial accelerometer to measure ground reaction force in running: A reliability and validity comparison with force plates",
abstract = "Objectives: The use of microsensor technologies to conduct research and implement interventions in sports and exercise medicine has increased recently. The objective of this paper was to determine the validity and reliability of the ViPerform as a measure of load compared to vertical ground reaction force (GRF) as measured by force plates. Design: Absolute reliability assessment, with concurrent validity. Methods: 10 professional triathletes ran 10 trials over force plates with the ViPerform mounted on the mid portion of the medial tibia. Calculated vertical ground reaction force data from the ViPerform was matched to the same stride on the force plate. Bland-Altman (BA) plot of comparative measure of agreement was used to assess the relationship between the calculated load from the accelerometer and the force plates. Reliability was calculated by intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) with 95{\%} confidence intervals. Results: BA plot indicates minimal agreement between the measures derived from the force plate and ViPerform, with variation at an individual participant plot level. Reliability was excellent (ICC = 0.877; 95{\%} CI = 0.825-0.917) in calculating the same vertical GRF in a repeated trial. Standard error of measure (SEM) equalled 99.83 units (95{\%} CI = 82.10-119.09), which, in turn, gave a minimum detectable change (MDC) value of 276.72 units (95{\%} CI = 227.32-330.07). Conclusions: The ViPerform does not calculate absolute values of vertical GRF similar to those measured by a force plate. It does provide a valid and reliable calculation of an athlete's lower limb load at constant velocity.",
keywords = "Ground reaction force, Load, Tibial accelerometer, ViPerform",
author = "Raper, {Damian P.} and Jeremy Witchalls and Philips, {Elissa J.} and Emma Knight and Drew, {Michael K} and Gordon Waddington",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1016/j.jsams.2017.06.010",
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volume = "21",
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Use of a tibial accelerometer to measure ground reaction force in running: A reliability and validity comparison with force plates. / Raper, Damian P.; Witchalls, Jeremy; Philips, Elissa J.; Knight, Emma; Drew, Michael K; Waddington, Gordon.

In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Vol. 21, No. 1, 2018, p. 84-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of a tibial accelerometer to measure ground reaction force in running: A reliability and validity comparison with force plates

AU - Raper, Damian P.

AU - Witchalls, Jeremy

AU - Philips, Elissa J.

AU - Knight, Emma

AU - Drew, Michael K

AU - Waddington, Gordon

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Objectives: The use of microsensor technologies to conduct research and implement interventions in sports and exercise medicine has increased recently. The objective of this paper was to determine the validity and reliability of the ViPerform as a measure of load compared to vertical ground reaction force (GRF) as measured by force plates. Design: Absolute reliability assessment, with concurrent validity. Methods: 10 professional triathletes ran 10 trials over force plates with the ViPerform mounted on the mid portion of the medial tibia. Calculated vertical ground reaction force data from the ViPerform was matched to the same stride on the force plate. Bland-Altman (BA) plot of comparative measure of agreement was used to assess the relationship between the calculated load from the accelerometer and the force plates. Reliability was calculated by intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) with 95% confidence intervals. Results: BA plot indicates minimal agreement between the measures derived from the force plate and ViPerform, with variation at an individual participant plot level. Reliability was excellent (ICC = 0.877; 95% CI = 0.825-0.917) in calculating the same vertical GRF in a repeated trial. Standard error of measure (SEM) equalled 99.83 units (95% CI = 82.10-119.09), which, in turn, gave a minimum detectable change (MDC) value of 276.72 units (95% CI = 227.32-330.07). Conclusions: The ViPerform does not calculate absolute values of vertical GRF similar to those measured by a force plate. It does provide a valid and reliable calculation of an athlete's lower limb load at constant velocity.

AB - Objectives: The use of microsensor technologies to conduct research and implement interventions in sports and exercise medicine has increased recently. The objective of this paper was to determine the validity and reliability of the ViPerform as a measure of load compared to vertical ground reaction force (GRF) as measured by force plates. Design: Absolute reliability assessment, with concurrent validity. Methods: 10 professional triathletes ran 10 trials over force plates with the ViPerform mounted on the mid portion of the medial tibia. Calculated vertical ground reaction force data from the ViPerform was matched to the same stride on the force plate. Bland-Altman (BA) plot of comparative measure of agreement was used to assess the relationship between the calculated load from the accelerometer and the force plates. Reliability was calculated by intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) with 95% confidence intervals. Results: BA plot indicates minimal agreement between the measures derived from the force plate and ViPerform, with variation at an individual participant plot level. Reliability was excellent (ICC = 0.877; 95% CI = 0.825-0.917) in calculating the same vertical GRF in a repeated trial. Standard error of measure (SEM) equalled 99.83 units (95% CI = 82.10-119.09), which, in turn, gave a minimum detectable change (MDC) value of 276.72 units (95% CI = 227.32-330.07). Conclusions: The ViPerform does not calculate absolute values of vertical GRF similar to those measured by a force plate. It does provide a valid and reliable calculation of an athlete's lower limb load at constant velocity.

KW - Ground reaction force

KW - Load

KW - Tibial accelerometer

KW - ViPerform

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U2 - 10.1016/j.jsams.2017.06.010

DO - 10.1016/j.jsams.2017.06.010

M3 - Article

VL - 21

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JO - Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

JF - Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

SN - 1440-2440

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ER -