Uses, Beliefs, and Conservation of Turtles by Ashaninka Indigenous People, Central Peru

de Oliveira Ferronato Bruno, Giselle Cruzado

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We used informal conservation and focus group techniques to gather information in 2 Ashaninka communities in Pichis River valley, central Peru. We found that turtles were mainly used as food, although some medicinal and supernatural uses were also reported. Locals demonstrated a comprehensive knowledge on the underlying causes of contemporary reductions in turtle abundance within their territory; their spiritual beliefs, including taboos on catching turtles, and those relating to supernatural or sacred sites caused them to avoid hunting and fishing in some wetlands.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)308-313
    Number of pages6
    JournalChelonian Conservation Biology
    Volume12
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Fingerprint

    indigenous peoples
    turtle
    Peru
    turtles
    capture of animals
    focus groups
    hunting
    fishing
    wetlands
    valleys
    wetland
    valley
    rivers
    food
    river
    methodology

    Cite this

    Bruno, de Oliveira Ferronato ; Cruzado, Giselle. / Uses, Beliefs, and Conservation of Turtles by Ashaninka Indigenous People, Central Peru. In: Chelonian Conservation Biology. 2013 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 308-313.
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    abstract = "We used informal conservation and focus group techniques to gather information in 2 Ashaninka communities in Pichis River valley, central Peru. We found that turtles were mainly used as food, although some medicinal and supernatural uses were also reported. Locals demonstrated a comprehensive knowledge on the underlying causes of contemporary reductions in turtle abundance within their territory; their spiritual beliefs, including taboos on catching turtles, and those relating to supernatural or sacred sites caused them to avoid hunting and fishing in some wetlands.",
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    Uses, Beliefs, and Conservation of Turtles by Ashaninka Indigenous People, Central Peru. / Bruno, de Oliveira Ferronato; Cruzado, Giselle.

    In: Chelonian Conservation Biology, Vol. 12, No. 2, 2013, p. 308-313.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    PY - 2013

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