Using a Game Sense Approach to Teach Buroinjin as an Aboriginal Game to Address Social Justice in Physical Education

John Williams, Shane Pill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To explore a teacher educator professional learning opportunity within the context of a taught unit of work at a government primary school in Canberra, Australia’s national capital. The unit of work focus was a traditional Australian Aboriginal game taught using a Game Sense Approach to deliver a socially just version of quality physical education. Method: A qualitative self-study methodology was adopted where the participants were Author 1 and 49 Year 5 students (aged 10–11 years). Results: Game Sense Approach was found to be an effective professional learning opportunity for Author 1, while Author 2’s knowledge about Indigenous perspectives in physical education was extended. In addition, student participants valued the taught lessons, which highlighted issues of social justice. Discussion/Conclusion: It is possible for the self-study approach described here and seemingly incompatible epistemological approaches to work together to realize a socially just version of quality physical education that can inform physical education teaching beyond this study.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberAhead of Print
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Teaching in Physical Education
Early online date2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Oct 2019

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Physical Education and Training
Social Justice
physical education
social justice
self-study
Learning
Students
learning
primary school
Teaching
student
Economics
educator
methodology
teacher

Cite this

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