Using a household food inventory to assess the availability of traditional vegetables among resettled African refugees

Catherine Gichunge, Shawn Somerset, Neil Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A cross-sectional sequential explanatory mixed methods study was conducted among household food preparers to examine the association between home availability and consumption of traditional vegetables among resettled African refugees living in Queensland, Australia. Home availability of traditional African vegetables was associated with age, having a vegetable garden, employment status, and having a supermarket in the local neighborhood. Food preparers from homes with low vegetable availability were less likely to consume the recommended number of vegetable servings. Barriers faced in the food environment included language, lack of availability of traditional vegetables and lack of transport. All of these aspects contributed to the study findings that both individual and food environment characteristics may play a role in access to and availability of food and vegetable consumption of resettled refugees. Consumption of traditional foods among the resettled refugees continues post resettlement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Jan 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Refugees
Vegetables
Food
Equipment and Supplies
Queensland
Language

Cite this

@article{d2383078e791447d94e6f2118ffc2dfe,
title = "Using a household food inventory to assess the availability of traditional vegetables among resettled African refugees",
abstract = "A cross-sectional sequential explanatory mixed methods study was conducted among household food preparers to examine the association between home availability and consumption of traditional vegetables among resettled African refugees living in Queensland, Australia. Home availability of traditional African vegetables was associated with age, having a vegetable garden, employment status, and having a supermarket in the local neighborhood. Food preparers from homes with low vegetable availability were less likely to consume the recommended number of vegetable servings. Barriers faced in the food environment included language, lack of availability of traditional vegetables and lack of transport. All of these aspects contributed to the study findings that both individual and food environment characteristics may play a role in access to and availability of food and vegetable consumption of resettled refugees. Consumption of traditional foods among the resettled refugees continues post resettlement.",
keywords = "African traditional vegetables, Household food inventory, Migration, Resettled African refugees, Vegetable availability, Vegetable intake",
author = "Catherine Gichunge and Shawn Somerset and Neil Harris",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "18",
doi = "10.3390/ijerph13010137",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "1--12",
journal = "International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health",
issn = "1660-4601",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using a household food inventory to assess the availability of traditional vegetables among resettled African refugees

AU - Gichunge, Catherine

AU - Somerset, Shawn

AU - Harris, Neil

PY - 2016/1/18

Y1 - 2016/1/18

N2 - A cross-sectional sequential explanatory mixed methods study was conducted among household food preparers to examine the association between home availability and consumption of traditional vegetables among resettled African refugees living in Queensland, Australia. Home availability of traditional African vegetables was associated with age, having a vegetable garden, employment status, and having a supermarket in the local neighborhood. Food preparers from homes with low vegetable availability were less likely to consume the recommended number of vegetable servings. Barriers faced in the food environment included language, lack of availability of traditional vegetables and lack of transport. All of these aspects contributed to the study findings that both individual and food environment characteristics may play a role in access to and availability of food and vegetable consumption of resettled refugees. Consumption of traditional foods among the resettled refugees continues post resettlement.

AB - A cross-sectional sequential explanatory mixed methods study was conducted among household food preparers to examine the association between home availability and consumption of traditional vegetables among resettled African refugees living in Queensland, Australia. Home availability of traditional African vegetables was associated with age, having a vegetable garden, employment status, and having a supermarket in the local neighborhood. Food preparers from homes with low vegetable availability were less likely to consume the recommended number of vegetable servings. Barriers faced in the food environment included language, lack of availability of traditional vegetables and lack of transport. All of these aspects contributed to the study findings that both individual and food environment characteristics may play a role in access to and availability of food and vegetable consumption of resettled refugees. Consumption of traditional foods among the resettled refugees continues post resettlement.

KW - African traditional vegetables

KW - Household food inventory

KW - Migration

KW - Resettled African refugees

KW - Vegetable availability

KW - Vegetable intake

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84955083145&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/ijerph13010137

DO - 10.3390/ijerph13010137

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 1

EP - 12

JO - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

JF - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

SN - 1660-4601

IS - 1

ER -