Using Deception to Establish a Reproducible Improvement in 4-Km Cycling Time Trial Performance

Renjay Shei, Kevin THOMPSON, Robert Chapman, John Raglin, Timothy Mickleborough

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    14 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We investigated whether performance gains achieved with deception persisted after the deception was revealed, and whether pacing strategy changed. 14 trained cyclists completed 4 simulated 4-km time trials (TT) on a cycle ergometer comprising familiarization and baseline trials (BAS), followed by "unaware" (of deception, UAW) and "aware" (of deception, AW) trials on separate days. In the UAW trial, participants competed against an on-screen avatar set at 102% of their baseline trial mean power output (Pmean) believing it was set at 100% of BAS Pmean. 24 h prior to the AW trial, participants were informed of the deception in the UAW trial. 4 participants did not improve in the UAW trial compared to BAS. 10 participants improved time to completion (TTC) and Pmean in the UAW and AW trials compared to BAS (p0.05) for these participants. In summary, deception did not improve performance in all participants. However, participants whose time trial performance improved following deception could retain their performance gains once the deception was revealed, demonstrating a similar pacing strategy and RPE response.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)341-346
    Number of pages6
    JournalInternational Journal of Sports Medicine
    Volume37
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2016

    Fingerprint

    Deception

    Cite this

    Shei, Renjay ; THOMPSON, Kevin ; Chapman, Robert ; Raglin, John ; Mickleborough, Timothy. / Using Deception to Establish a Reproducible Improvement in 4-Km Cycling Time Trial Performance. In: International Journal of Sports Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 37, No. 5. pp. 341-346.
    @article{e567cac2c4c943789d80b4638f64b8a8,
    title = "Using Deception to Establish a Reproducible Improvement in 4-Km Cycling Time Trial Performance",
    abstract = "We investigated whether performance gains achieved with deception persisted after the deception was revealed, and whether pacing strategy changed. 14 trained cyclists completed 4 simulated 4-km time trials (TT) on a cycle ergometer comprising familiarization and baseline trials (BAS), followed by {"}unaware{"} (of deception, UAW) and {"}aware{"} (of deception, AW) trials on separate days. In the UAW trial, participants competed against an on-screen avatar set at 102{\%} of their baseline trial mean power output (Pmean) believing it was set at 100{\%} of BAS Pmean. 24 h prior to the AW trial, participants were informed of the deception in the UAW trial. 4 participants did not improve in the UAW trial compared to BAS. 10 participants improved time to completion (TTC) and Pmean in the UAW and AW trials compared to BAS (p0.05) for these participants. In summary, deception did not improve performance in all participants. However, participants whose time trial performance improved following deception could retain their performance gains once the deception was revealed, demonstrating a similar pacing strategy and RPE response.",
    keywords = "Athletes, Athletic Performance, Bicycling, Deception, Exercise Test, Humans, Male, Oxygen Consumption, Workload, Young Adult, Journal Article",
    author = "Renjay Shei and Kevin THOMPSON and Robert Chapman and John Raglin and Timothy Mickleborough",
    note = "{\circledC} Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.",
    year = "2016",
    month = "5",
    doi = "10.1055/s-0035-1565139",
    language = "English",
    volume = "37",
    pages = "341--346",
    journal = "International Journal of Sports Medicine",
    issn = "0172-4622",
    publisher = "Georg Thieme Verlag",
    number = "5",

    }

    Using Deception to Establish a Reproducible Improvement in 4-Km Cycling Time Trial Performance. / Shei, Renjay; THOMPSON, Kevin; Chapman, Robert; Raglin, John; Mickleborough, Timothy.

    In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 37, No. 5, 05.2016, p. 341-346.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Using Deception to Establish a Reproducible Improvement in 4-Km Cycling Time Trial Performance

    AU - Shei, Renjay

    AU - THOMPSON, Kevin

    AU - Chapman, Robert

    AU - Raglin, John

    AU - Mickleborough, Timothy

    N1 - © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

    PY - 2016/5

    Y1 - 2016/5

    N2 - We investigated whether performance gains achieved with deception persisted after the deception was revealed, and whether pacing strategy changed. 14 trained cyclists completed 4 simulated 4-km time trials (TT) on a cycle ergometer comprising familiarization and baseline trials (BAS), followed by "unaware" (of deception, UAW) and "aware" (of deception, AW) trials on separate days. In the UAW trial, participants competed against an on-screen avatar set at 102% of their baseline trial mean power output (Pmean) believing it was set at 100% of BAS Pmean. 24 h prior to the AW trial, participants were informed of the deception in the UAW trial. 4 participants did not improve in the UAW trial compared to BAS. 10 participants improved time to completion (TTC) and Pmean in the UAW and AW trials compared to BAS (p0.05) for these participants. In summary, deception did not improve performance in all participants. However, participants whose time trial performance improved following deception could retain their performance gains once the deception was revealed, demonstrating a similar pacing strategy and RPE response.

    AB - We investigated whether performance gains achieved with deception persisted after the deception was revealed, and whether pacing strategy changed. 14 trained cyclists completed 4 simulated 4-km time trials (TT) on a cycle ergometer comprising familiarization and baseline trials (BAS), followed by "unaware" (of deception, UAW) and "aware" (of deception, AW) trials on separate days. In the UAW trial, participants competed against an on-screen avatar set at 102% of their baseline trial mean power output (Pmean) believing it was set at 100% of BAS Pmean. 24 h prior to the AW trial, participants were informed of the deception in the UAW trial. 4 participants did not improve in the UAW trial compared to BAS. 10 participants improved time to completion (TTC) and Pmean in the UAW and AW trials compared to BAS (p0.05) for these participants. In summary, deception did not improve performance in all participants. However, participants whose time trial performance improved following deception could retain their performance gains once the deception was revealed, demonstrating a similar pacing strategy and RPE response.

    KW - Athletes

    KW - Athletic Performance

    KW - Bicycling

    KW - Deception

    KW - Exercise Test

    KW - Humans

    KW - Male

    KW - Oxygen Consumption

    KW - Workload

    KW - Young Adult

    KW - Journal Article

    U2 - 10.1055/s-0035-1565139

    DO - 10.1055/s-0035-1565139

    M3 - Article

    VL - 37

    SP - 341

    EP - 346

    JO - International Journal of Sports Medicine

    JF - International Journal of Sports Medicine

    SN - 0172-4622

    IS - 5

    ER -