Validity and Reliability of GPS Units to Monitor Cricket-Specific Movement Patterns

Carl Petersen, David Pyne, Marc Portus, B Dawson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

138 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE:
The validity and reliability of three commercial global positioning system (GPS) units (MinimaxX, Catapult, Australia; SPI-10, SPI-Pro, GPSports, Australia) were quantified.
METHODS:
Twenty trials of cricket-specific locomotion patterns and distances (walking 8800 m, jogging 2400 m, running 1200 m, striding 600 m, sprinting 20- to 40-m intervals, and run-a-three) were compared against criterion measures (400-m athletic track, electronic timing). Validity was quantified with the standard error of the estimate (SEE) and reliability estimated using typical error expressed as a coefficient of variation.
RESULTS:
The validity (mean +/- 90% confidence limits) for locomotion patterns walking to striding ranged from 0.4 +/- 0.1 to 3.8 +/- 1.4%, whereas for sprinting distances over 20 to 40 m including run-a-three (approx. 50 m) the SEE ranged from 2.6 +/- 1.0 to 23.8 +/- 8.8%. The reliability (expressed as mean [90% confidence limits]) of estimating distance traveled by walking to striding ranged from 0.3 (0.2 to 0.4) to 2.9% (2.3 to 4.0). Similarly, mean reliability of estimating different sprinting distances over 20 to 40 m ranged from 2.0 (1.6 to 2.8) to 30.0% (23.2 to 43.3).
CONCLUSIONS:
The accuracy and bias was dependent on the GPS brand employed. Commercially available GPS units have acceptable validity and reliability for estimating longer distances (600-8800 m) in walking to striding, but require further development for shorter cricket-specific sprinting distances
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)381-393
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume4
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Gryllidae
Geographic Information Systems
Reproducibility of Results
Walking
Locomotion
Jogging
Running
Sports

Cite this

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title = "Validity and Reliability of GPS Units to Monitor Cricket-Specific Movement Patterns",
abstract = "PURPOSE:The validity and reliability of three commercial global positioning system (GPS) units (MinimaxX, Catapult, Australia; SPI-10, SPI-Pro, GPSports, Australia) were quantified.METHODS:Twenty trials of cricket-specific locomotion patterns and distances (walking 8800 m, jogging 2400 m, running 1200 m, striding 600 m, sprinting 20- to 40-m intervals, and run-a-three) were compared against criterion measures (400-m athletic track, electronic timing). Validity was quantified with the standard error of the estimate (SEE) and reliability estimated using typical error expressed as a coefficient of variation.RESULTS:The validity (mean +/- 90{\%} confidence limits) for locomotion patterns walking to striding ranged from 0.4 +/- 0.1 to 3.8 +/- 1.4{\%}, whereas for sprinting distances over 20 to 40 m including run-a-three (approx. 50 m) the SEE ranged from 2.6 +/- 1.0 to 23.8 +/- 8.8{\%}. The reliability (expressed as mean [90{\%} confidence limits]) of estimating distance traveled by walking to striding ranged from 0.3 (0.2 to 0.4) to 2.9{\%} (2.3 to 4.0). Similarly, mean reliability of estimating different sprinting distances over 20 to 40 m ranged from 2.0 (1.6 to 2.8) to 30.0{\%} (23.2 to 43.3).CONCLUSIONS:The accuracy and bias was dependent on the GPS brand employed. Commercially available GPS units have acceptable validity and reliability for estimating longer distances (600-8800 m) in walking to striding, but require further development for shorter cricket-specific sprinting distances",
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Validity and Reliability of GPS Units to Monitor Cricket-Specific Movement Patterns. / Petersen, Carl; Pyne, David; Portus, Marc; Dawson, B.

In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, Vol. 4, No. 3, 09.2009, p. 381-393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Validity and Reliability of GPS Units to Monitor Cricket-Specific Movement Patterns

AU - Petersen, Carl

AU - Pyne, David

AU - Portus, Marc

AU - Dawson, B

PY - 2009/9

Y1 - 2009/9

N2 - PURPOSE:The validity and reliability of three commercial global positioning system (GPS) units (MinimaxX, Catapult, Australia; SPI-10, SPI-Pro, GPSports, Australia) were quantified.METHODS:Twenty trials of cricket-specific locomotion patterns and distances (walking 8800 m, jogging 2400 m, running 1200 m, striding 600 m, sprinting 20- to 40-m intervals, and run-a-three) were compared against criterion measures (400-m athletic track, electronic timing). Validity was quantified with the standard error of the estimate (SEE) and reliability estimated using typical error expressed as a coefficient of variation.RESULTS:The validity (mean +/- 90% confidence limits) for locomotion patterns walking to striding ranged from 0.4 +/- 0.1 to 3.8 +/- 1.4%, whereas for sprinting distances over 20 to 40 m including run-a-three (approx. 50 m) the SEE ranged from 2.6 +/- 1.0 to 23.8 +/- 8.8%. The reliability (expressed as mean [90% confidence limits]) of estimating distance traveled by walking to striding ranged from 0.3 (0.2 to 0.4) to 2.9% (2.3 to 4.0). Similarly, mean reliability of estimating different sprinting distances over 20 to 40 m ranged from 2.0 (1.6 to 2.8) to 30.0% (23.2 to 43.3).CONCLUSIONS:The accuracy and bias was dependent on the GPS brand employed. Commercially available GPS units have acceptable validity and reliability for estimating longer distances (600-8800 m) in walking to striding, but require further development for shorter cricket-specific sprinting distances

AB - PURPOSE:The validity and reliability of three commercial global positioning system (GPS) units (MinimaxX, Catapult, Australia; SPI-10, SPI-Pro, GPSports, Australia) were quantified.METHODS:Twenty trials of cricket-specific locomotion patterns and distances (walking 8800 m, jogging 2400 m, running 1200 m, striding 600 m, sprinting 20- to 40-m intervals, and run-a-three) were compared against criterion measures (400-m athletic track, electronic timing). Validity was quantified with the standard error of the estimate (SEE) and reliability estimated using typical error expressed as a coefficient of variation.RESULTS:The validity (mean +/- 90% confidence limits) for locomotion patterns walking to striding ranged from 0.4 +/- 0.1 to 3.8 +/- 1.4%, whereas for sprinting distances over 20 to 40 m including run-a-three (approx. 50 m) the SEE ranged from 2.6 +/- 1.0 to 23.8 +/- 8.8%. The reliability (expressed as mean [90% confidence limits]) of estimating distance traveled by walking to striding ranged from 0.3 (0.2 to 0.4) to 2.9% (2.3 to 4.0). Similarly, mean reliability of estimating different sprinting distances over 20 to 40 m ranged from 2.0 (1.6 to 2.8) to 30.0% (23.2 to 43.3).CONCLUSIONS:The accuracy and bias was dependent on the GPS brand employed. Commercially available GPS units have acceptable validity and reliability for estimating longer distances (600-8800 m) in walking to striding, but require further development for shorter cricket-specific sprinting distances

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KW - precision

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JO - International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

JF - International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

SN - 1555-0265

IS - 3

ER -