Validity of the SenseWear armband to assess energy expenditure during intermittent exercise and recovery in rugby union players

Sara ZANETTI, Kate PUMPA, Keane WHEELER, David Pyne

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Abstract

Portable wearable devices that assess energy expenditure during intermittent exercise and recovery would be useful in team sports. Fourteen state-level male rugby union players (mean ± SD: age, 22 ± 4 years; body mass, 88.8 ± 11.2 kg; height, 1.81 ± 0.07 m, body fat, 18 ± 6% ) participated in this study. Energy expenditure was measured by the Sense- Wear Armband (SWA) and validated against indirect calorimetry as the criterion measure during a 42-minute rugby-specific intermittent exercise test and an immediate postexercise 10-minute recovery period. Energy expenditure measurements from indirect calorimetry and the SWA were only moderately correlated during both the exercise test (r = 0.55, ±0.34; mean, ±90% confidence limits) and recovery period (r = 0.58, ±0.33). The SWA estimate of energy expenditure during exercise was unclear, with a mean bias of -1.9% (±5.3%), and during recovery energy expenditure was overestimated, with a mean bias of 17% (±12%) at the mean estimated energy expenditure. Typical error of SWA energy expenditure estimates expressed as a coefficient of variation (±90% confidence interval) was 10% (8-16%) during exercise and 19% (14-30%) during recovery. The SWA did not provide a valid measure of energy expenditure during rugby-specific intermittent exercise or 10-minute postexercise recovery. Further improvements are required in the performance of the SWA before it can be used routinely in intermittent sports and provide worthwhile information in relation to workloads of athletes for sport scientists and coaches
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1090-1095
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Football
Energy Metabolism
Exercise
Sports
Indirect Calorimetry
Exercise Test
Workload
Athletes
Adipose Tissue
Confidence Intervals
Equipment and Supplies

Cite this

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title = "Validity of the SenseWear armband to assess energy expenditure during intermittent exercise and recovery in rugby union players",
abstract = "Portable wearable devices that assess energy expenditure during intermittent exercise and recovery would be useful in team sports. Fourteen state-level male rugby union players (mean ± SD: age, 22 ± 4 years; body mass, 88.8 ± 11.2 kg; height, 1.81 ± 0.07 m, body fat, 18 ± 6{\%} ) participated in this study. Energy expenditure was measured by the Sense- Wear Armband (SWA) and validated against indirect calorimetry as the criterion measure during a 42-minute rugby-specific intermittent exercise test and an immediate postexercise 10-minute recovery period. Energy expenditure measurements from indirect calorimetry and the SWA were only moderately correlated during both the exercise test (r = 0.55, ±0.34; mean, ±90{\%} confidence limits) and recovery period (r = 0.58, ±0.33). The SWA estimate of energy expenditure during exercise was unclear, with a mean bias of -1.9{\%} (±5.3{\%}), and during recovery energy expenditure was overestimated, with a mean bias of 17{\%} (±12{\%}) at the mean estimated energy expenditure. Typical error of SWA energy expenditure estimates expressed as a coefficient of variation (±90{\%} confidence interval) was 10{\%} (8-16{\%}) during exercise and 19{\%} (14-30{\%}) during recovery. The SWA did not provide a valid measure of energy expenditure during rugby-specific intermittent exercise or 10-minute postexercise recovery. Further improvements are required in the performance of the SWA before it can be used routinely in intermittent sports and provide worthwhile information in relation to workloads of athletes for sport scientists and coaches",
keywords = "Accuracy, Energy cost, Indirect calorimetry, Motion sensor, Repeat sprinting, Team sport",
author = "Sara ZANETTI and Kate PUMPA and Keane WHEELER and David Pyne",
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AU - ZANETTI, Sara

AU - PUMPA, Kate

AU - WHEELER, Keane

AU - Pyne, David

PY - 2014

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N2 - Portable wearable devices that assess energy expenditure during intermittent exercise and recovery would be useful in team sports. Fourteen state-level male rugby union players (mean ± SD: age, 22 ± 4 years; body mass, 88.8 ± 11.2 kg; height, 1.81 ± 0.07 m, body fat, 18 ± 6% ) participated in this study. Energy expenditure was measured by the Sense- Wear Armband (SWA) and validated against indirect calorimetry as the criterion measure during a 42-minute rugby-specific intermittent exercise test and an immediate postexercise 10-minute recovery period. Energy expenditure measurements from indirect calorimetry and the SWA were only moderately correlated during both the exercise test (r = 0.55, ±0.34; mean, ±90% confidence limits) and recovery period (r = 0.58, ±0.33). The SWA estimate of energy expenditure during exercise was unclear, with a mean bias of -1.9% (±5.3%), and during recovery energy expenditure was overestimated, with a mean bias of 17% (±12%) at the mean estimated energy expenditure. Typical error of SWA energy expenditure estimates expressed as a coefficient of variation (±90% confidence interval) was 10% (8-16%) during exercise and 19% (14-30%) during recovery. The SWA did not provide a valid measure of energy expenditure during rugby-specific intermittent exercise or 10-minute postexercise recovery. Further improvements are required in the performance of the SWA before it can be used routinely in intermittent sports and provide worthwhile information in relation to workloads of athletes for sport scientists and coaches

AB - Portable wearable devices that assess energy expenditure during intermittent exercise and recovery would be useful in team sports. Fourteen state-level male rugby union players (mean ± SD: age, 22 ± 4 years; body mass, 88.8 ± 11.2 kg; height, 1.81 ± 0.07 m, body fat, 18 ± 6% ) participated in this study. Energy expenditure was measured by the Sense- Wear Armband (SWA) and validated against indirect calorimetry as the criterion measure during a 42-minute rugby-specific intermittent exercise test and an immediate postexercise 10-minute recovery period. Energy expenditure measurements from indirect calorimetry and the SWA were only moderately correlated during both the exercise test (r = 0.55, ±0.34; mean, ±90% confidence limits) and recovery period (r = 0.58, ±0.33). The SWA estimate of energy expenditure during exercise was unclear, with a mean bias of -1.9% (±5.3%), and during recovery energy expenditure was overestimated, with a mean bias of 17% (±12%) at the mean estimated energy expenditure. Typical error of SWA energy expenditure estimates expressed as a coefficient of variation (±90% confidence interval) was 10% (8-16%) during exercise and 19% (14-30%) during recovery. The SWA did not provide a valid measure of energy expenditure during rugby-specific intermittent exercise or 10-minute postexercise recovery. Further improvements are required in the performance of the SWA before it can be used routinely in intermittent sports and provide worthwhile information in relation to workloads of athletes for sport scientists and coaches

KW - Accuracy

KW - Energy cost

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KW - Repeat sprinting

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