Value-added processes in publishing and the impact of ICT's, the democratization of publishing and globalisation

Stuart Ferguson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The spread of information and communication technologies into publishing is
generally seen as a boon ‐ to authors, readers and a number of intermediaries such as libraries. Like many of the technologies associated with the "Knowledge society", publishing techologies are often interpreted as part of a welcome process of democratization, allowing individual authors and organizations to publish reasonably high quality books of their own creation. This paper examines the value‐added processes of publishing from the perspective of the Centre for Information Studies, Charles Sturt University ‐ a small, niche librarianship publisher in Australia, with a strong record of book publishing and the beginnings of a presence in e‐publishing. Based on the Centre's experience, the paper suggests that the costs of publishing in a growing, competitive and global market make it increasingly difficult for publishers to continue adding value in what many have come to call a knowledge society. 
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-40
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of the Book
Volume4
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

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knowledge society
value added
democratization
globalization
librarianship
communication technology
information technology
market
costs
Values
experience
Globalization
Democratization
Communication
Costs

Cite this

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Value-added processes in publishing and the impact of ICT's, the democratization of publishing and globalisation. / Ferguson, Stuart.

In: International Journal of the Book, Vol. 4, No. 2, 2007, p. 35-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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