Vegetation science in a cultural landscape - The case of Kakadu National Park

Peter B. Bridgewater, Jeremy Russell-Smith, Ian D. Cresswell

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Vegetation pattern in Australia is influenced by climate and edaphic factors. A significant factor influencing pattern is also the cultural influence of Aboriginal people and their land management practices. These include burning of country to produce heterogeneity, and manipulation of small rainforest patches in a fashion akin to gardening. Landscapes which have such intensive human interaction are termed cultural landscapes. Examples of this phenomenon are discussed from Kakadu National Park, Northern Australia.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)67-83
    Number of pages17
    JournalPhytocoenologia
    Volume28
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1998

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    national parks
    gardening
    vegetation
    indigenous peoples
    edaphic factors
    land management
    rain forests
    climate
    cultural landscape

    Cite this

    Bridgewater, Peter B. ; Russell-Smith, Jeremy ; Cresswell, Ian D. / Vegetation science in a cultural landscape - The case of Kakadu National Park. In: Phytocoenologia. 1998 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 67-83.
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    Bridgewater, PB, Russell-Smith, J & Cresswell, ID 1998, 'Vegetation science in a cultural landscape - The case of Kakadu National Park', Phytocoenologia, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 67-83. https://doi.org/10.1127/phyto/28/1998/67

    Vegetation science in a cultural landscape - The case of Kakadu National Park. / Bridgewater, Peter B.; Russell-Smith, Jeremy; Cresswell, Ian D.

    In: Phytocoenologia, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.01.1998, p. 67-83.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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