Villains, Victims and Bystanders in Financial Crime

Bruce ARNOLD, Wendy BONYTHON

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter considers the psychology of financial crime in terms of the criminals, their victims and bystander such as government regulators and auditors who might be expected to prevent harms associated with figures such as Madoff, Maxwell and Stanford. It offers an overview of theories of what motivates the criminals, why some people are receptive to exploitation, and why systems of belief in gatekeeper institutions result in regulatory incapacity that inhibits effective risk identification and action to minimise that crime. The chapter highlights particular incidents since the 1880s, arguing that financial crime is a systemic problem that requires active management. It also argues that the psychology of financial crime is diverse, inducing caution about explanations purportedly enabling systematic pre-diction and prevention of large-scale offences.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFinancial Crimes: Psychological, Technological, and Ethical Issues
EditorsMichel Dion, David Weisstub, Jean-Loup Richet
Place of PublicationSwitzerland
PublisherSpringer
Pages167-198
Number of pages32
ISBN (Print)9783319324180
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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offense
psychology
language usage
gatekeeper
exploitation
incident
management

Cite this

ARNOLD, B., & BONYTHON, W. (2016). Villains, Victims and Bystanders in Financial Crime. In M. Dion, D. Weisstub, & J-L. Richet (Eds.), Financial Crimes: Psychological, Technological, and Ethical Issues (pp. 167-198). Switzerland: Springer.
ARNOLD, Bruce ; BONYTHON, Wendy. / Villains, Victims and Bystanders in Financial Crime. Financial Crimes: Psychological, Technological, and Ethical Issues. editor / Michel Dion ; David Weisstub ; Jean-Loup Richet. Switzerland : Springer, 2016. pp. 167-198
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ARNOLD, B & BONYTHON, W 2016, Villains, Victims and Bystanders in Financial Crime. in M Dion, D Weisstub & J-L Richet (eds), Financial Crimes: Psychological, Technological, and Ethical Issues. Springer, Switzerland, pp. 167-198.

Villains, Victims and Bystanders in Financial Crime. / ARNOLD, Bruce; BONYTHON, Wendy.

Financial Crimes: Psychological, Technological, and Ethical Issues. ed. / Michel Dion; David Weisstub; Jean-Loup Richet. Switzerland : Springer, 2016. p. 167-198.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

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ARNOLD B, BONYTHON W. Villains, Victims and Bystanders in Financial Crime. In Dion M, Weisstub D, Richet J-L, editors, Financial Crimes: Psychological, Technological, and Ethical Issues. Switzerland: Springer. 2016. p. 167-198