Waterwatch data quality: an opportunity to augment professionally collected data sets

Fiona DYER, Evan HARRISON, Bernd GRUBER, Sue NICHOLS, Woo O'Reilly

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

    Abstract

    Community based monitoring of water quality and aquatic ecosystems, such as Waterwatch in Australia, forms an important portion of the community monitoring efforts worldwide, however, such data are rarely accessible or used in decision making. Waterwatch data have traditionally been criticised as being of inferior quality compared with professionally collected data and as such have seen limited use and incorporation into government data sets. Water quality data collected from 2003 onwards by Waterwatch volunteers in the Australian Capital Territory region were compared with equivalent data collected by government agencies, consulting firms and academic institutions (professionally collected data). The water quality variables compared were electrical conductivity, pH, turbidity and dissolved oxygen. Excellent agreement between Waterwatch and professionally collected data sets were observed for electrical conductivity and pH indicating that the quality of these data are indistinguishable from professionally collected data. Good agreement was observed between the Waterwatch and professionally collected turbidity and dissolved oxygen data particularly given differences in methods used to collect the data and differences in sampling times. The quality of the data collected by the community based volunteers provides an opportunity to incorporate Waterwatch programs into jurisdictional wide monitoring strategies with confidence and allows augmentation of existing monitoring effort to enhance water quality management outcomes.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication7th Australian Stream Management Conference
    EditorsG Vietz, I.D Rutherfurd, R Hughes
    Place of PublicationAustralia
    PublisherThe River Basin Management Society
    Pages357-362
    Number of pages6
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    Event7th Australian Stream Management Conference - Townsville, Townsville, Australia
    Duration: 1 Jul 2014 → …
    http://www.7asm.org.au/ (conference website)

    Conference

    Conference7th Australian Stream Management Conference
    CountryAustralia
    CityTownsville
    Period1/07/14 → …
    Internet address

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    data quality
    monitoring
    water quality
    electrical conductivity
    turbidity
    dissolved oxygen
    aquatic ecosystem
    decision making
    sampling

    Cite this

    DYER, F., HARRISON, E., GRUBER, B., NICHOLS, S., & O'Reilly, W. (2014). Waterwatch data quality: an opportunity to augment professionally collected data sets. In G. Vietz, I. D. Rutherfurd, & R. Hughes (Eds.), 7th Australian Stream Management Conference (pp. 357-362). Australia: The River Basin Management Society.
    DYER, Fiona ; HARRISON, Evan ; GRUBER, Bernd ; NICHOLS, Sue ; O'Reilly, Woo. / Waterwatch data quality: an opportunity to augment professionally collected data sets. 7th Australian Stream Management Conference. editor / G Vietz ; I.D Rutherfurd ; R Hughes. Australia : The River Basin Management Society, 2014. pp. 357-362
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    title = "Waterwatch data quality: an opportunity to augment professionally collected data sets",
    abstract = "Community based monitoring of water quality and aquatic ecosystems, such as Waterwatch in Australia, forms an important portion of the community monitoring efforts worldwide, however, such data are rarely accessible or used in decision making. Waterwatch data have traditionally been criticised as being of inferior quality compared with professionally collected data and as such have seen limited use and incorporation into government data sets. Water quality data collected from 2003 onwards by Waterwatch volunteers in the Australian Capital Territory region were compared with equivalent data collected by government agencies, consulting firms and academic institutions (professionally collected data). The water quality variables compared were electrical conductivity, pH, turbidity and dissolved oxygen. Excellent agreement between Waterwatch and professionally collected data sets were observed for electrical conductivity and pH indicating that the quality of these data are indistinguishable from professionally collected data. Good agreement was observed between the Waterwatch and professionally collected turbidity and dissolved oxygen data particularly given differences in methods used to collect the data and differences in sampling times. The quality of the data collected by the community based volunteers provides an opportunity to incorporate Waterwatch programs into jurisdictional wide monitoring strategies with confidence and allows augmentation of existing monitoring effort to enhance water quality management outcomes.",
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    DYER, F, HARRISON, E, GRUBER, B, NICHOLS, S & O'Reilly, W 2014, Waterwatch data quality: an opportunity to augment professionally collected data sets. in G Vietz, ID Rutherfurd & R Hughes (eds), 7th Australian Stream Management Conference. The River Basin Management Society, Australia, pp. 357-362, 7th Australian Stream Management Conference, Townsville, Australia, 1/07/14.

    Waterwatch data quality: an opportunity to augment professionally collected data sets. / DYER, Fiona; HARRISON, Evan; GRUBER, Bernd; NICHOLS, Sue; O'Reilly, Woo.

    7th Australian Stream Management Conference. ed. / G Vietz; I.D Rutherfurd; R Hughes. Australia : The River Basin Management Society, 2014. p. 357-362.

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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    N2 - Community based monitoring of water quality and aquatic ecosystems, such as Waterwatch in Australia, forms an important portion of the community monitoring efforts worldwide, however, such data are rarely accessible or used in decision making. Waterwatch data have traditionally been criticised as being of inferior quality compared with professionally collected data and as such have seen limited use and incorporation into government data sets. Water quality data collected from 2003 onwards by Waterwatch volunteers in the Australian Capital Territory region were compared with equivalent data collected by government agencies, consulting firms and academic institutions (professionally collected data). The water quality variables compared were electrical conductivity, pH, turbidity and dissolved oxygen. Excellent agreement between Waterwatch and professionally collected data sets were observed for electrical conductivity and pH indicating that the quality of these data are indistinguishable from professionally collected data. Good agreement was observed between the Waterwatch and professionally collected turbidity and dissolved oxygen data particularly given differences in methods used to collect the data and differences in sampling times. The quality of the data collected by the community based volunteers provides an opportunity to incorporate Waterwatch programs into jurisdictional wide monitoring strategies with confidence and allows augmentation of existing monitoring effort to enhance water quality management outcomes.

    AB - Community based monitoring of water quality and aquatic ecosystems, such as Waterwatch in Australia, forms an important portion of the community monitoring efforts worldwide, however, such data are rarely accessible or used in decision making. Waterwatch data have traditionally been criticised as being of inferior quality compared with professionally collected data and as such have seen limited use and incorporation into government data sets. Water quality data collected from 2003 onwards by Waterwatch volunteers in the Australian Capital Territory region were compared with equivalent data collected by government agencies, consulting firms and academic institutions (professionally collected data). The water quality variables compared were electrical conductivity, pH, turbidity and dissolved oxygen. Excellent agreement between Waterwatch and professionally collected data sets were observed for electrical conductivity and pH indicating that the quality of these data are indistinguishable from professionally collected data. Good agreement was observed between the Waterwatch and professionally collected turbidity and dissolved oxygen data particularly given differences in methods used to collect the data and differences in sampling times. The quality of the data collected by the community based volunteers provides an opportunity to incorporate Waterwatch programs into jurisdictional wide monitoring strategies with confidence and allows augmentation of existing monitoring effort to enhance water quality management outcomes.

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    DYER F, HARRISON E, GRUBER B, NICHOLS S, O'Reilly W. Waterwatch data quality: an opportunity to augment professionally collected data sets. In Vietz G, Rutherfurd ID, Hughes R, editors, 7th Australian Stream Management Conference. Australia: The River Basin Management Society. 2014. p. 357-362