‘We Have Our Own Stories to Write, and We Will Write Them’: Defining Resilience with Aboriginal Young People

Reakeeta Smallwood, Kim Usher, Cindy Woods, Vicki Saunders, Debra Jackson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Colonization is understood as a determinant of health for Indigenous people globally. Understanding colonization through a lens of historical trauma offers new insights into the field of Aboriginal young peoples’ health and wellbeing. Grounded in the Indigenous research paradigm, this study conducted interviews with 15 Aboriginal young people living on Gamilaroi Country, New South Wales, Australia. Three stories are presented to explain how Aboriginal young people understand their resilience, strength and resistance as an integral component of historical trauma. Aboriginal young people identified the need to connect and to continue to draw strength from their ancestors and to be cognizant of the hope and strengths they have as Aboriginal people and describe how this strength can ensure Aboriginal culture is sustained for generations to come.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)277-295
    Number of pages19
    JournalYoung
    Volume32
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2024

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