We have the means but what's the model? A better way for universities and industry to produce investigative journalism

Bill Birnbauer, Andrew Dodd, Matthew RICKETSON

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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    Abstract

    This paper offers a solution to two problems facing Australian journalism: the declining numbers working in newsrooms on investigative journalism and the shortage of specific and up to date curriculum materials about investigative journalism. These problems create an opportunity for universities not only to improve teaching of journalism but for them to play a greater role in providing the public with the fruits of investigative journalism projects. This paper examines the various models for producing investigative journalism within university settings. It explores collaborations with industry partners and the various forms of selfpublishing undertaken by journalism courses. It asks which forms of association with industry work well and which forms of investigative journalism best suit such collaborations. It assesses recent examples in which industry partners work alongside journalism students on investigative projects. Several universities have created their own print outlets for investigative journalism and the proliferation of digital platforms has made self-publishing more accessible. This paper asks how worthwhile these stories are if they are limited to university rather than mainstream or independent publications. The paper proposes a new approach to industry-academy collaborative investigative journalism and the creation of a new model that draws on the successes and failures of existing and previous ones so that universities can better realise their potential in this field and so that student learning can be enhanced while audiences are better served.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationRefereed Proceedings of the Australian and New Zealand Communication Association conference: Global Networks-Global Divides: Bridging New and Traditional Communication Challenges
    EditorsTerence Lee, Kathryn Trees, Renae Desai
    Place of PublicationAustralia
    PublisherAustralian and New Zealand Communication Association (ANZCA)
    Pages1-15
    Number of pages15
    Volume1
    Publication statusPublished - 2013
    EventAustralian and New Zealand Communication Association 2013 Conference - Fremantle, Fremantle, Australia
    Duration: 3 Jul 20135 Jul 2013

    Publication series

    NameAustralian and New Zealand Communication Association
    PublisherAustralian and New Zealand Communication Association
    ISSN (Print)1448-4331

    Conference

    ConferenceAustralian and New Zealand Communication Association 2013 Conference
    CountryAustralia
    CityFremantle
    Period3/07/135/07/13

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    sensationalist journalism
    industry
    university
    journalism
    proliferation
    academy
    shortage
    student
    curriculum

    Cite this

    Birnbauer, B., Dodd, A., & RICKETSON, M. (2013). We have the means but what's the model? A better way for universities and industry to produce investigative journalism. In T. Lee, K. Trees, & R. Desai (Eds.), Refereed Proceedings of the Australian and New Zealand Communication Association conference: Global Networks-Global Divides: Bridging New and Traditional Communication Challenges (Vol. 1, pp. 1-15). (Australian and New Zealand Communication Association). Australia: Australian and New Zealand Communication Association (ANZCA).
    Birnbauer, Bill ; Dodd, Andrew ; RICKETSON, Matthew. / We have the means but what's the model? A better way for universities and industry to produce investigative journalism. Refereed Proceedings of the Australian and New Zealand Communication Association conference: Global Networks-Global Divides: Bridging New and Traditional Communication Challenges. editor / Terence Lee ; Kathryn Trees ; Renae Desai. Vol. 1 Australia : Australian and New Zealand Communication Association (ANZCA), 2013. pp. 1-15 (Australian and New Zealand Communication Association).
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    abstract = "This paper offers a solution to two problems facing Australian journalism: the declining numbers working in newsrooms on investigative journalism and the shortage of specific and up to date curriculum materials about investigative journalism. These problems create an opportunity for universities not only to improve teaching of journalism but for them to play a greater role in providing the public with the fruits of investigative journalism projects. This paper examines the various models for producing investigative journalism within university settings. It explores collaborations with industry partners and the various forms of selfpublishing undertaken by journalism courses. It asks which forms of association with industry work well and which forms of investigative journalism best suit such collaborations. It assesses recent examples in which industry partners work alongside journalism students on investigative projects. Several universities have created their own print outlets for investigative journalism and the proliferation of digital platforms has made self-publishing more accessible. This paper asks how worthwhile these stories are if they are limited to university rather than mainstream or independent publications. The paper proposes a new approach to industry-academy collaborative investigative journalism and the creation of a new model that draws on the successes and failures of existing and previous ones so that universities can better realise their potential in this field and so that student learning can be enhanced while audiences are better served.",
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    Birnbauer, B, Dodd, A & RICKETSON, M 2013, We have the means but what's the model? A better way for universities and industry to produce investigative journalism. in T Lee, K Trees & R Desai (eds), Refereed Proceedings of the Australian and New Zealand Communication Association conference: Global Networks-Global Divides: Bridging New and Traditional Communication Challenges. vol. 1, Australian and New Zealand Communication Association, Australian and New Zealand Communication Association (ANZCA), Australia, pp. 1-15, Australian and New Zealand Communication Association 2013 Conference, Fremantle, Australia, 3/07/13.

    We have the means but what's the model? A better way for universities and industry to produce investigative journalism. / Birnbauer, Bill; Dodd, Andrew; RICKETSON, Matthew.

    Refereed Proceedings of the Australian and New Zealand Communication Association conference: Global Networks-Global Divides: Bridging New and Traditional Communication Challenges. ed. / Terence Lee; Kathryn Trees; Renae Desai. Vol. 1 Australia : Australian and New Zealand Communication Association (ANZCA), 2013. p. 1-15 (Australian and New Zealand Communication Association).

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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    AB - This paper offers a solution to two problems facing Australian journalism: the declining numbers working in newsrooms on investigative journalism and the shortage of specific and up to date curriculum materials about investigative journalism. These problems create an opportunity for universities not only to improve teaching of journalism but for them to play a greater role in providing the public with the fruits of investigative journalism projects. This paper examines the various models for producing investigative journalism within university settings. It explores collaborations with industry partners and the various forms of selfpublishing undertaken by journalism courses. It asks which forms of association with industry work well and which forms of investigative journalism best suit such collaborations. It assesses recent examples in which industry partners work alongside journalism students on investigative projects. Several universities have created their own print outlets for investigative journalism and the proliferation of digital platforms has made self-publishing more accessible. This paper asks how worthwhile these stories are if they are limited to university rather than mainstream or independent publications. The paper proposes a new approach to industry-academy collaborative investigative journalism and the creation of a new model that draws on the successes and failures of existing and previous ones so that universities can better realise their potential in this field and so that student learning can be enhanced while audiences are better served.

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    Birnbauer B, Dodd A, RICKETSON M. We have the means but what's the model? A better way for universities and industry to produce investigative journalism. In Lee T, Trees K, Desai R, editors, Refereed Proceedings of the Australian and New Zealand Communication Association conference: Global Networks-Global Divides: Bridging New and Traditional Communication Challenges. Vol. 1. Australia: Australian and New Zealand Communication Association (ANZCA). 2013. p. 1-15. (Australian and New Zealand Communication Association).