Whaling or wailing?

Peter Bridgewater

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    On the face of it, international arguments about whaling are simple. There is broad support for the view that hunting whales should be banned, and strong opposition from certain countries. Yet the arguments are in fact much more complex, and illustrate among other things the growing gap between the existing legal framework and the issues it is now called upon to deal with. This gap in turn reflects the increasing complexity of environmental debate, and in particular the tensions between traditional conservationism and approaches hostile to anthropocentrism. The article emphasises how this framework encounters difficulties in dealing with human issues of cultural diversity as well as the "multi-scale" nature of ecological dynamics. It concludes that, as debate has opened, the focus on urgent issues of conservation may have been lost.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)555-560
    Number of pages6
    JournalInternational Social Science Journal
    Volume55
    Issue number178
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2003

    Fingerprint

    anthropocentrism
    cultural diversity
    opposition
    conservation

    Cite this

    Bridgewater, P. (2003). Whaling or wailing? International Social Science Journal, 55(178), 555-560.
    Bridgewater, Peter. / Whaling or wailing?. In: International Social Science Journal. 2003 ; Vol. 55, No. 178. pp. 555-560.
    @article{0ddfbc06db3148ddb3bfc940bfa6d755,
    title = "Whaling or wailing?",
    abstract = "On the face of it, international arguments about whaling are simple. There is broad support for the view that hunting whales should be banned, and strong opposition from certain countries. Yet the arguments are in fact much more complex, and illustrate among other things the growing gap between the existing legal framework and the issues it is now called upon to deal with. This gap in turn reflects the increasing complexity of environmental debate, and in particular the tensions between traditional conservationism and approaches hostile to anthropocentrism. The article emphasises how this framework encounters difficulties in dealing with human issues of cultural diversity as well as the {"}multi-scale{"} nature of ecological dynamics. It concludes that, as debate has opened, the focus on urgent issues of conservation may have been lost.",
    author = "Peter Bridgewater",
    year = "2003",
    month = "12",
    day = "1",
    language = "English",
    volume = "55",
    pages = "555--560",
    journal = "International Social Science Journal",
    issn = "0020-8701",
    publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
    number = "178",

    }

    Bridgewater, P 2003, 'Whaling or wailing?', International Social Science Journal, vol. 55, no. 178, pp. 555-560.

    Whaling or wailing? / Bridgewater, Peter.

    In: International Social Science Journal, Vol. 55, No. 178, 01.12.2003, p. 555-560.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Whaling or wailing?

    AU - Bridgewater, Peter

    PY - 2003/12/1

    Y1 - 2003/12/1

    N2 - On the face of it, international arguments about whaling are simple. There is broad support for the view that hunting whales should be banned, and strong opposition from certain countries. Yet the arguments are in fact much more complex, and illustrate among other things the growing gap between the existing legal framework and the issues it is now called upon to deal with. This gap in turn reflects the increasing complexity of environmental debate, and in particular the tensions between traditional conservationism and approaches hostile to anthropocentrism. The article emphasises how this framework encounters difficulties in dealing with human issues of cultural diversity as well as the "multi-scale" nature of ecological dynamics. It concludes that, as debate has opened, the focus on urgent issues of conservation may have been lost.

    AB - On the face of it, international arguments about whaling are simple. There is broad support for the view that hunting whales should be banned, and strong opposition from certain countries. Yet the arguments are in fact much more complex, and illustrate among other things the growing gap between the existing legal framework and the issues it is now called upon to deal with. This gap in turn reflects the increasing complexity of environmental debate, and in particular the tensions between traditional conservationism and approaches hostile to anthropocentrism. The article emphasises how this framework encounters difficulties in dealing with human issues of cultural diversity as well as the "multi-scale" nature of ecological dynamics. It concludes that, as debate has opened, the focus on urgent issues of conservation may have been lost.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0346395845&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    M3 - Article

    VL - 55

    SP - 555

    EP - 560

    JO - International Social Science Journal

    JF - International Social Science Journal

    SN - 0020-8701

    IS - 178

    ER -

    Bridgewater P. Whaling or wailing? International Social Science Journal. 2003 Dec 1;55(178):555-560.