What are the Barriers and Enablers to Physical Activity Participation in Women with Ovarian Cancer? A Rapid Review of the Literature

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background
Engagement in regular physical activity is recommended for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer due to aggressive treatment approaches, an increased risk of disease recurrence and low survival rates.

Objectives
To synthesize the current available evidence identifying barriers and enablers to participation in physical activity among women diagnosed with ovarian cancer.

Data Sources
Peer-reviewed articles in electronic databases including CINAHL, Cochrane, Medline, Psych INFO and Scopus and key studies’ reference lists.

Conclusion
Although evidence pertaining to the study population was limited, the findings of this review suggest women with ovarian cancer experience similar barriers and enablers to the general population and other cancer cohorts. The primary barriers to physical activity participation reported by this population were treatment or disease related side effects, fear of injury or falling and the absence of physical activity counselling. Key enablers reported to facilitate physical activity participation were the implementation of individualized interventions with targeted goals in addition to support from health and medical professionals. Future research on ovarian cancer populations is warranted to further explore perceived barriers and enablers.

Implications for Nursing Practice
Nurses working within the oncology field are well positioned clinically to facilitate physical activity engagement and identify and overcome barriers to participation within a population that experiences high mortality rates and disease recurrence.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalSeminars in Oncology Nursing
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2 Oct 2020

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