What do lunchtime staff think about children's eating habits following a healthy eating intervention?

Felicity South, Charlotte Taylor, Helena Darby, Penney Upton, Dominic Upton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Over a period of 12 months, the team visited 15 primary schools across the West Midlands and measured food intake at school and home: before the programme started, atthree months and one year post intervention using a combination of weighed intake, visual estimation and photographic food diaries. Children’s food intake was recorded atbreak-time and during school lunchtime. Children’s knowledge and attitudes towards healthy eating, family eating habits and the experiences of school staff were alsoassessed using questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. This enabled the team to explore possible reasons for any changes in child behaviour and also identifyreasons for children not changing their behaviours or not maintaining changes in the long term.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)108-112
Number of pages5
JournalEducation and Health
Volume30
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lunch
Feeding Behavior
Eating
Diet Records
Child Behavior
Interviews
Healthy Diet

Cite this

South, Felicity ; Taylor, Charlotte ; Darby, Helena ; Upton, Penney ; Upton, Dominic. / What do lunchtime staff think about children's eating habits following a healthy eating intervention?. In: Education and Health. 2012 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 108-112.
@article{22ba012836dc4d97b13cbb30548d97b4,
title = "What do lunchtime staff think about children's eating habits following a healthy eating intervention?",
abstract = "Over a period of 12 months, the team visited 15 primary schools across the West Midlands and measured food intake at school and home: before the programme started, atthree months and one year post intervention using a combination of weighed intake, visual estimation and photographic food diaries. Children’s food intake was recorded atbreak-time and during school lunchtime. Children’s knowledge and attitudes towards healthy eating, family eating habits and the experiences of school staff were alsoassessed using questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. This enabled the team to explore possible reasons for any changes in child behaviour and also identifyreasons for children not changing their behaviours or not maintaining changes in the long term.",
author = "Felicity South and Charlotte Taylor and Helena Darby and Penney Upton and Dominic Upton",
year = "2012",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "108--112",
journal = "Education and Health",
issn = "0265-1602",
publisher = "SHEU, Schools Health Education Unit",
number = "4",

}

What do lunchtime staff think about children's eating habits following a healthy eating intervention? / South, Felicity; Taylor, Charlotte; Darby, Helena; Upton, Penney; Upton, Dominic.

In: Education and Health, Vol. 30, No. 4, 2012, p. 108-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - What do lunchtime staff think about children's eating habits following a healthy eating intervention?

AU - South, Felicity

AU - Taylor, Charlotte

AU - Darby, Helena

AU - Upton, Penney

AU - Upton, Dominic

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Over a period of 12 months, the team visited 15 primary schools across the West Midlands and measured food intake at school and home: before the programme started, atthree months and one year post intervention using a combination of weighed intake, visual estimation and photographic food diaries. Children’s food intake was recorded atbreak-time and during school lunchtime. Children’s knowledge and attitudes towards healthy eating, family eating habits and the experiences of school staff were alsoassessed using questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. This enabled the team to explore possible reasons for any changes in child behaviour and also identifyreasons for children not changing their behaviours or not maintaining changes in the long term.

AB - Over a period of 12 months, the team visited 15 primary schools across the West Midlands and measured food intake at school and home: before the programme started, atthree months and one year post intervention using a combination of weighed intake, visual estimation and photographic food diaries. Children’s food intake was recorded atbreak-time and during school lunchtime. Children’s knowledge and attitudes towards healthy eating, family eating habits and the experiences of school staff were alsoassessed using questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. This enabled the team to explore possible reasons for any changes in child behaviour and also identifyreasons for children not changing their behaviours or not maintaining changes in the long term.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84872571021&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 108

EP - 112

JO - Education and Health

JF - Education and Health

SN - 0265-1602

IS - 4

ER -