What do we know about raspberry leaf?

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

Abstract

Background: Midwives and women have been using raspberry leaf (Rubusidaeus) to help birth since at least the 6th Century. Recent surveys tell us that raspberry leaf use is still prevalent all over the world. Research from Melbourne identified that over a third of Australian women are taking herbal supplements to help their birth,with the most common being Raspberry Leaf. While there is a long history of anecdotal use, women are taking Raspberry Leaf in their pregnancy without any clinical evidence for efficacy or safety. Objective: This integrative review aims to examine the potential pharmaceutical properties of raspberry leaf and the diversity of its use with an emphasis on pregnancy. Methods: An integrative review of the available research was conducted. Five databases were explored – Scopus, CINAHL Plus, Medline, Cochrane Library and Web of Science using the search terms raspberry leaf, pregnant, labour, labor, uterus, uterine, birth.Traditional herbal texts, a bibliographic search of retrieved reports, and an analysis of citations of retrieved refences were also included. Articles included in this integrative review were assessed using validated tools. Findings: While there was no high-level evidence for raspberry leaf influencing women’s birth outcomes, there is some evidence of an effect in animals. This included both uterine contraction and effect on offspring. There is a diverse variety of regimes being used by both women and midwives in the prescription of raspberry leaf use. There is also a theoretical basis upon which to suspect raspberry leaf may influence iron absorption and other pregnancy related conditions. Conclusion: These findings are important to women, midwives,practitioners, policy makers, governing bodies and researchers,providing a clearer understanding of the potential of raspberry leaf to influence pregnancy. This may provide perspective to current debates regarding the regulation, education and funding given to research on raspberry leaf use in pregnancy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S26-S26
Number of pages1
JournalWomen and Birth
Volume32
Issue numberS1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2019

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Midwifery
Pregnancy
Parturition
Rubus
Library Science
Research
Uterine Contraction
Administrative Personnel
Uterus
Prescriptions
Iron
Research Personnel
Databases
Safety
Education
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Cite this

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title = "What do we know about raspberry leaf?",
abstract = "Background: Midwives and women have been using raspberry leaf (Rubusidaeus) to help birth since at least the 6th Century. Recent surveys tell us that raspberry leaf use is still prevalent all over the world. Research from Melbourne identified that over a third of Australian women are taking herbal supplements to help their birth,with the most common being Raspberry Leaf. While there is a long history of anecdotal use, women are taking Raspberry Leaf in their pregnancy without any clinical evidence for efficacy or safety. Objective: This integrative review aims to examine the potential pharmaceutical properties of raspberry leaf and the diversity of its use with an emphasis on pregnancy. Methods: An integrative review of the available research was conducted. Five databases were explored – Scopus, CINAHL Plus, Medline, Cochrane Library and Web of Science using the search terms raspberry leaf, pregnant, labour, labor, uterus, uterine, birth.Traditional herbal texts, a bibliographic search of retrieved reports, and an analysis of citations of retrieved refences were also included. Articles included in this integrative review were assessed using validated tools. Findings: While there was no high-level evidence for raspberry leaf influencing women’s birth outcomes, there is some evidence of an effect in animals. This included both uterine contraction and effect on offspring. There is a diverse variety of regimes being used by both women and midwives in the prescription of raspberry leaf use. There is also a theoretical basis upon which to suspect raspberry leaf may influence iron absorption and other pregnancy related conditions. Conclusion: These findings are important to women, midwives,practitioners, policy makers, governing bodies and researchers,providing a clearer understanding of the potential of raspberry leaf to influence pregnancy. This may provide perspective to current debates regarding the regulation, education and funding given to research on raspberry leaf use in pregnancy.",
author = "Rebekah Bowman and Deborah Davis and Sally Ferguson and Jan Taylor",
year = "2019",
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doi = "10.1016/j.wombi.2019.07.225",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "S26--S26",
journal = "Australian journal of midwifery : professional journal of the Australian College of Midwives Incorporated",
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}

What do we know about raspberry leaf? / Bowman, Rebekah; Davis, Deborah; Ferguson, Sally; Taylor, Jan.

In: Women and Birth, Vol. 32, No. S1, 09.2019, p. S26-S26.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

TY - JOUR

T1 - What do we know about raspberry leaf?

AU - Bowman, Rebekah

AU - Davis, Deborah

AU - Ferguson, Sally

AU - Taylor, Jan

PY - 2019/9

Y1 - 2019/9

N2 - Background: Midwives and women have been using raspberry leaf (Rubusidaeus) to help birth since at least the 6th Century. Recent surveys tell us that raspberry leaf use is still prevalent all over the world. Research from Melbourne identified that over a third of Australian women are taking herbal supplements to help their birth,with the most common being Raspberry Leaf. While there is a long history of anecdotal use, women are taking Raspberry Leaf in their pregnancy without any clinical evidence for efficacy or safety. Objective: This integrative review aims to examine the potential pharmaceutical properties of raspberry leaf and the diversity of its use with an emphasis on pregnancy. Methods: An integrative review of the available research was conducted. Five databases were explored – Scopus, CINAHL Plus, Medline, Cochrane Library and Web of Science using the search terms raspberry leaf, pregnant, labour, labor, uterus, uterine, birth.Traditional herbal texts, a bibliographic search of retrieved reports, and an analysis of citations of retrieved refences were also included. Articles included in this integrative review were assessed using validated tools. Findings: While there was no high-level evidence for raspberry leaf influencing women’s birth outcomes, there is some evidence of an effect in animals. This included both uterine contraction and effect on offspring. There is a diverse variety of regimes being used by both women and midwives in the prescription of raspberry leaf use. There is also a theoretical basis upon which to suspect raspberry leaf may influence iron absorption and other pregnancy related conditions. Conclusion: These findings are important to women, midwives,practitioners, policy makers, governing bodies and researchers,providing a clearer understanding of the potential of raspberry leaf to influence pregnancy. This may provide perspective to current debates regarding the regulation, education and funding given to research on raspberry leaf use in pregnancy.

AB - Background: Midwives and women have been using raspberry leaf (Rubusidaeus) to help birth since at least the 6th Century. Recent surveys tell us that raspberry leaf use is still prevalent all over the world. Research from Melbourne identified that over a third of Australian women are taking herbal supplements to help their birth,with the most common being Raspberry Leaf. While there is a long history of anecdotal use, women are taking Raspberry Leaf in their pregnancy without any clinical evidence for efficacy or safety. Objective: This integrative review aims to examine the potential pharmaceutical properties of raspberry leaf and the diversity of its use with an emphasis on pregnancy. Methods: An integrative review of the available research was conducted. Five databases were explored – Scopus, CINAHL Plus, Medline, Cochrane Library and Web of Science using the search terms raspberry leaf, pregnant, labour, labor, uterus, uterine, birth.Traditional herbal texts, a bibliographic search of retrieved reports, and an analysis of citations of retrieved refences were also included. Articles included in this integrative review were assessed using validated tools. Findings: While there was no high-level evidence for raspberry leaf influencing women’s birth outcomes, there is some evidence of an effect in animals. This included both uterine contraction and effect on offspring. There is a diverse variety of regimes being used by both women and midwives in the prescription of raspberry leaf use. There is also a theoretical basis upon which to suspect raspberry leaf may influence iron absorption and other pregnancy related conditions. Conclusion: These findings are important to women, midwives,practitioners, policy makers, governing bodies and researchers,providing a clearer understanding of the potential of raspberry leaf to influence pregnancy. This may provide perspective to current debates regarding the regulation, education and funding given to research on raspberry leaf use in pregnancy.

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/we-know-about-raspberry-leaf

U2 - 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.07.225

DO - 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.07.225

M3 - Meeting Abstract

VL - 32

SP - S26-S26

JO - Australian journal of midwifery : professional journal of the Australian College of Midwives Incorporated

JF - Australian journal of midwifery : professional journal of the Australian College of Midwives Incorporated

SN - 1871-5192

IS - S1

ER -