What does glycated hemoglobin measure? Allostatic load in Indigenous populations

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

Abstract

The correlation of phenomena such as stress, socioeconomic position, and status inequality with health outcomes is well documented empirically, but our ability to control and explain the means by which these affect health has been more modest. Understanding the basis of relationships between health and the social environment has important implications for health and social policy. Our article "Glycated Hemoglobin as an Indicator of Social Environmental Stress in Indigenous versus Westernized Populations" attempts to shed light on the biological pathways mediating psychosocial influences on health. We proposed that biological responses to environmental stress could mediate vulnerability to the wide variety of outcomes that distinguish the poor health. We proposed that biological responses to environmental stress could mediate vulnerability to the wide variety of outcomes that distinguish the poor health of indigenous populations in industrialized countries. This reasoning draws on evidence for the long-term impact of the physiologic response to chronic stress, or "allostatic load".
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)439-440
Number of pages2
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Allostasis
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Population Groups
Health
Social Environment
Public Policy
Health Policy
Developed Countries
Social Class

Cite this

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title = "What does glycated hemoglobin measure? Allostatic load in Indigenous populations",
abstract = "The correlation of phenomena such as stress, socioeconomic position, and status inequality with health outcomes is well documented empirically, but our ability to control and explain the means by which these affect health has been more modest. Understanding the basis of relationships between health and the social environment has important implications for health and social policy. Our article {"}Glycated Hemoglobin as an Indicator of Social Environmental Stress in Indigenous versus Westernized Populations{"} attempts to shed light on the biological pathways mediating psychosocial influences on health. We proposed that biological responses to environmental stress could mediate vulnerability to the wide variety of outcomes that distinguish the poor health. We proposed that biological responses to environmental stress could mediate vulnerability to the wide variety of outcomes that distinguish the poor health of indigenous populations in industrialized countries. This reasoning draws on evidence for the long-term impact of the physiologic response to chronic stress, or {"}allostatic load{"}.",
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What does glycated hemoglobin measure? Allostatic load in Indigenous populations. / DANIEL, Mark.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 30, No. 5, 05.2000, p. 439-440.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

TY - JOUR

T1 - What does glycated hemoglobin measure? Allostatic load in Indigenous populations

AU - DANIEL, Mark

PY - 2000/5

Y1 - 2000/5

N2 - The correlation of phenomena such as stress, socioeconomic position, and status inequality with health outcomes is well documented empirically, but our ability to control and explain the means by which these affect health has been more modest. Understanding the basis of relationships between health and the social environment has important implications for health and social policy. Our article "Glycated Hemoglobin as an Indicator of Social Environmental Stress in Indigenous versus Westernized Populations" attempts to shed light on the biological pathways mediating psychosocial influences on health. We proposed that biological responses to environmental stress could mediate vulnerability to the wide variety of outcomes that distinguish the poor health. We proposed that biological responses to environmental stress could mediate vulnerability to the wide variety of outcomes that distinguish the poor health of indigenous populations in industrialized countries. This reasoning draws on evidence for the long-term impact of the physiologic response to chronic stress, or "allostatic load".

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JF - Preventive Medicine

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