What has emotional intelligence got to do with it: The moderating role of EI on the relationships between workplace incivility and mental health?

Leanne Carter, Jennifer Loh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Workplace incivility (WI) has detrimental consequences on victims and has been linked positively to depression, anxiety and stress. However, emotional intelligence (EI) which involves the ability to manage one's and other's emotions has been positively associated with lower symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress; suggesting that EI may act as a buffer against stressors. Therefore, the present study tested a model which proposed that EI would moderate the relationships between WI and depression, between WI and anxiety, as well as between WI and stress. Data was collected using an online survey from 184 Australian adult workers. Results indicated that EI moderated the relationships between WI and depression and between WI and stress. Although a main effect was found between WI and anxiety, EI did not significantly moderated the relationship between WI and anxiety. Implications and future directions were discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-58
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Journal of Work Organisation and Emotion
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Mental health
Work place
Incivility
Emotional intelligence
Anxiety
Emotion
Online survey
Workers
Stressors
Future directions
Buffer

Cite this

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abstract = "Workplace incivility (WI) has detrimental consequences on victims and has been linked positively to depression, anxiety and stress. However, emotional intelligence (EI) which involves the ability to manage one's and other's emotions has been positively associated with lower symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress; suggesting that EI may act as a buffer against stressors. Therefore, the present study tested a model which proposed that EI would moderate the relationships between WI and depression, between WI and anxiety, as well as between WI and stress. Data was collected using an online survey from 184 Australian adult workers. Results indicated that EI moderated the relationships between WI and depression and between WI and stress. Although a main effect was found between WI and anxiety, EI did not significantly moderated the relationship between WI and anxiety. Implications and future directions were discussed.",
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