When Worlds Collide Quietly: Rock Art and the Mediation of Distance

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Narratives of the New World seldom begin without a bold pronouncement and an adventurous journey, yet the archaeology of rock art proposes a more nuanced account of the cross - cultural past: a new ground where the encounters, effects, and discoveries are felt on all sides. This chapter considers how researchers might discern processes of " contact " in less immediately obvious images. Focusing on a specific assemblage, this chapter explores the distances, both sociocultural and geographical, that Indigenous people traversed in making rock art. It is suggested that not only does rock art record a history of cross - cultural exchange, but it also actively mediates an outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationA Companion to Rock Art
EditorsJo McDonald, Peter Veth
Place of PublicationUnited Kingdom
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Chapter23
Pages399-419
Number of pages21
ISBN (Electronic)9781118253892
ISBN (Print)9781444334241
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Jul 2012
Externally publishedYes

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    Frederick, U. K. (2012). When Worlds Collide Quietly: Rock Art and the Mediation of Distance. In J. McDonald, & P. Veth (Eds.), A Companion to Rock Art (pp. 399-419). Wiley-Blackwell. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118253892.ch23