Women Firefighters’ Health and Well-Being

An International Survey

Emily R. Watkins, Anthony Walker, Eric Mol, Sara Jahnke, Alan J. Richardson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to identify specific health and well-being issues that women firefighters may experience as part of their daily working practices. Issues identified from this under-represented population can drive future research, education, and strategy to guide safety and health practices. Methods: A total of 840 women firefighters from 14 separate countries (255 United Kingdom and Ireland, 320 North America, 177 Australasia, and 88 mainland Europe) completed the survey over a 4-month period. Questions related to general health and well-being and role-specific health concerns, gender-related issues, and available exercise facilities. Results: Women firefighters in North America reported a higher prevalence of lower back (49%) and lower limb (51%) injuries than all other groups. North American respondents reported more heat illnesses (45%) than respondents from other places (36%). Thirty-nine percent of respondents thought their menstrual cycle and menopause affected work, and 36% were concerned for their ability to meet future job demands. Sixteen percent felt confident they could complete the role after 60 years of age. Women firefighters identified a lack of strength and conditioning support (50%) or lack of gym access (21%). The availability of female-specific personal protective equipment was greatest in the United Kingdom (66%) compared with other groups (42%). Conclusions: There is a need for female-specific strength and conditioning support and facilities to decrease injury and illness risk and improve longevity. Research and education into gynecological issues, heat exposure, and their effects on women firefighters’ fertility and cancer risk is required.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalWomen's Health Issues
Volume30
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Firefighters
Women's Health
well-being
conditioning
health
heat
Health
North America
illness
job demand
women's issues
menopause
Hot Temperature
Australasia
lack
Education
Aptitude
Ireland
Wounds and Injuries
fertility

Cite this

Watkins, E. R., Walker, A., Mol, E., Jahnke, S., & Richardson, A. J. (2019). Women Firefighters’ Health and Well-Being: An International Survey. Women's Health Issues, 30, 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.whi.2019.02.003
Watkins, Emily R. ; Walker, Anthony ; Mol, Eric ; Jahnke, Sara ; Richardson, Alan J. / Women Firefighters’ Health and Well-Being : An International Survey. In: Women's Health Issues. 2019 ; Vol. 30. pp. 1-8.
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Watkins, ER, Walker, A, Mol, E, Jahnke, S & Richardson, AJ 2019, 'Women Firefighters’ Health and Well-Being: An International Survey', Women's Health Issues, vol. 30, pp. 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.whi.2019.02.003

Women Firefighters’ Health and Well-Being : An International Survey. / Watkins, Emily R.; Walker, Anthony; Mol, Eric; Jahnke, Sara; Richardson, Alan J.

In: Women's Health Issues, Vol. 30, 01.01.2019, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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