‘You'll get good tips tonight’: An analysis of gendered appearance codes in the Australian service sector

Patricia Easteal, Jessica O'Neill, Trevor Ryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In some occupations, employers impose gendered appearance requirements on their employees. In this paper we present the findings of a small sample of Australian service industry workers subject to such requirements. We analyse these empirical findings to evaluate competing proposals in the literature for how to combat the material and other harms entailed by gendered appearance codes. We argue that the findings suggest that in the Australian context, these codes and the anachronistic norms that underpin them should be resisted across multiple fronts, including in employment and anti-discrimination law reform but also other sites of gender normalisation such as the media, schools and other institutions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)62-67
Number of pages6
JournalWomen's Studies International Forum
Volume70
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2018

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law reform
service sector
affirmative action
normalization
tertiary sector
employer
occupation
employee
worker
industry
gender
school
literature
analysis
code
material
services
norm
normalisation

Cite this

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‘You'll get good tips tonight’: An analysis of gendered appearance codes in the Australian service sector. / Easteal, Patricia; O'Neill, Jessica; Ryan, Trevor.

In: Women's Studies International Forum, Vol. 70, 01.09.2018, p. 62-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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